Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Trench Drain fall?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • jfulton
    replied
    Hey Dave,

    Thanks as always for the helpful advice in the forums. Do you have just concrete surrounding these trenches, or is it a top coat of some sort? I'm wanting to do a urethane enriched concrete topcoat after everything is in place, so I think this should solve the issue of the concrete failing around the edges of the drain (I've had this happen at my old brewery). One thing I noticed is that the manufacturer recommends to install an expansion joint around the drain, which would compromise the integrity of the topcoat. Without doing an expansion joint I worry about the concrete expanding and cracking this rather thin material. Have you had any cracking of the HDPE? What are your thoughts on this?

    Cheers!

    Leave a comment:


  • GlacierBrewing
    replied
    Hi Jamie,
    I have a 20'+ Dura Slope in my Brewhouse. I've had it in constant use since 2002 and it works great. The only two issues I've had are the thin cross pieces on the trench covers break over time (true, we are wheeling our Meheem, labeler, and keg washer over them all the time) and some of the concrete along the edge of the trench is wearing away. Besides those things, this is a must have!

    Prost!
    Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • jfulton
    replied
    Hey Mike,

    How are these DuraSlope trench drains holding up for you? I like the product, but am worried about long term durability. Any reservations?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sir Brewsalot
    replied
    Hey Mike!
    Thanks for chiming in. I'm probably spending way too many brain-hours on this, but I'm hoping to do it only once. So it's GREAT to know that HDPE will be fine for this... this is a HUGE help.

    Hope to cross paths with you some time soon!
    S

    Leave a comment:


  • tsewong73
    replied
    Scott! How are things, brother? I'd like to suggest DuraSlope from a company called NDS. Here's the link: http://www.ndspro.com/trench-drains-...-drain-system/

    I installed their sloped drain system in our place and it's been terrific. At first I was a little concerned about the plastic melting because of the chems and hot water, but that's never happened. It's fine. Don't let anybody scare you about that.

    The slope is 1/4" per foot (which works fine and dandy). It comes in 4-foot, interlocking sections and you have an option between a plastic or galvanized steel grate - I went with plastic. You just cant drive your forklift over it.

    Overall, I'm very happy with the drain system. Nasty shit doesn't cling to it and it hoses out very easily. The plastic grate comes in two-foot sections and is removable so you can hose them off or soak in caustic for a serious cleaning - which I don't really do very often. I pretty much hose the drains out once a week and we're fine.

    And we only paid just over $1,000 for a 40-foot run.

    Hope this helps and best wishes on the new place!

    -Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • Sir Brewsalot
    replied
    Thanks everyone. I just got done redesigning the whole room, thanks to the info that this thread has unearthed for me. We now have a much functional work area, a less costly pour, and now all I need to do is pick a brand of trench and buy them.

    But material choices are puzzling me now... HDPE, Polypropylene, lowly PVC, and probably a couple others. Are there any materials that I should absolutely avoid, given the thermal, chemical, and in this case mild mechanical stress (not driving over them) we put them through?

    Thanks again,
    Scott

    Leave a comment:


  • rudge75
    replied
    Not sure of the manufacturer, but I know they're poly drains that can withstand a forklift driving over them. They're manufactured in Saskatoon.

    They sound strikingly similar to what one of the other fellows here said - 3-4 sections with drop, then a couple of straight sections, then more drop over long runs.

    Consider that you want to build in all the drainage you can now before you start plopping tanks on the floor. You can cut in more later and attach them into the current drain, but it's a hell of a mess after the fact.

    Make sure you follow the install instructions and bolt the drains in place before forming the cement around them. If you miss a bolt, the drain starts to float (can you tell I speak from experience on this one?).

    Leave a comment:


  • Ted Briggs
    replied
    A bit off-topic but however you build them Some Quat on the floor and in the drains can help keep them from being funky, especially during downtime like over the weekend.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sir Brewsalot
    replied
    Thanks Todd! Checking them out now - looks like they have a nearby rep too.
    Scott

    Leave a comment:


  • toddlandon
    replied
    Look for Watts trench drains. They are two piece and will have the proper slope. You should have a 1/4" per foot for 3" DWV and smaller and 1/8 to 1/4 for 4" and larger.
    I will see if I have some photo's of my last install. They have different grates and some that will allow you to drive over. Plus you can put a tee in and such.
    Todd

    Leave a comment:


  • Sir Brewsalot
    replied
    Thanks for the help everyone!

    Rudge: splitting the difference is an option, but it would mean more saw cutting/excavating. We're pouring a floor onto an existing concrete floor, so every bit further down or across we go costs a little more the bust into it. Probably the way to go though.

    Originally posted by rudge75
    It's a 1/4 inch per foot on my engineered floor drains and they work well. We've got a sump pit in the middle with one leg running 40 feet and the other running about 30.
    Sounds like a similar scenario to what I'm looking to do here. What brand/model of trench did you use for this, if I may ask? I've been looking at Infinity Trench, but I don't see anything from them that's got any fall to it.

    Originally posted by yap
    Bear in mind this is my first trench drain install, but I have been researching options for weeks. If you are referring to pre-cast pre-sloped trench drain systems, most I have looked at are .6%-.7% slope. For long runs they have unsloped sections. The idea is that every 3rd or 4th section is a "neutral section" with no slope. Overall slope is maintained, but the total depth is not as deep.

    I would avoid a full no slope trench. Even if you spray it out often, water will still sit and stagnate.
    Looking for weeks here too! I've seen .7%, but not in the Polypropylene material I'm thinking I should use. I'm definitely after a drop-in trench, not a cast one. Interesting use of "neutral" sections in conjunctions with sloped... never considered that. Nice idea.
    Last edited by Sir Brewsalot; 11-16-2011, 12:12 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • yap
    replied
    Bear in mind this is my first trench drain install, but I have been researching options for weeks. If you are referring to pre-cast pre-sloped trench drain systems, most I have looked at are .6%-.7% slope. For long runs they have unsloped sections. The idea is that every 3rd or 4th section is a "neutral section" with no slope. Overall slope is maintained, but the total depth is not as deep.

    Of course if you are looking at non-pre-sloped or cast in place trench drains, then you can make the slope whatever you want....

    I would avoid a full no slope trench. Even if you spray it out often, water will still sit and stagnate.

    Leave a comment:


  • rudge75
    replied
    It's a 1/4 inch per foot on my engineered floor drains and they work well. We've got a sump pit in the middle with one leg running 40 feet and the other running about 30.

    Very nice having drains handy in the brewery. Next one we'll slope the floors since this one had to be quick due to concerns with our previous landlord (where we only had 6 feet of drain).

    Leave a comment:


  • kyle.carbaugh
    Guest replied
    Split the difference?

    Not knowing anything about your drainage 'sitch, could you split the difference? (i.e. put the drain the middle of the trough, sloping on each side) This would get you a 6" drop...

    Leave a comment:


  • Sir Brewsalot
    replied
    That's exactly what I was looking at. But we're doing a pretty long run - 24 feet, so if it's 1/2" per foot, that's 12" of fall along the entire run, if we drain from one end, as I think we need to. I'm guessing you can't string multiple troughs together like that without something that's constructed to be VERY deep at one end.

    S
    Last edited by Sir Brewsalot; 11-16-2011, 10:12 AM.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X