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Alfa-Laval Brew 80 centrifuge at work

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  • #16
    Originally posted by 10Torr View Post
    Just ordered the $1,500 carbon seal. Will post new DO numbers after we run it after replacement

    So how many barrels did you run through it before you saw the DO spike?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by 10Torr View Post
      Just ordered the $1,500 carbon seal. Will post new DO numbers after we run it after replacement
      If you haven't already you might also consider doing at least the intermediary service kit when you change the carbon seal (since you'll have the unit open and incurring downtime anyway). There are dozens of internal gaskets as well as several guide surfaces that require regular replacement or maintenance to keep things running properly.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by scotts View Post
        Hi TGTimm, just wondering if you could give more details on how you're liking your AL Brew 80 by now, as we're considering one.

        Do you have a turbidity meter that controls either the discharge of solids or the input flow valve? Any thoughts on that?

        What size tanks do you have, and are you still seeing the same 20-35 bbl/hour throughput? What about highly hopped beers - anything that it can't handle? And what about protein/polyphenol haze? Would love to hear any details you're willing to share!

        Cheers
        Well, it's been a while. I had to hit the brewers when we were spinning a hoppy ale and I had time.

        This is our Eagle Cap IPA, a NWIPA at ~81 IBU, B & A:

        Click image for larger version

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        Some haze remaining, but still much brighter than what it started at. I'm trying to get the brewers to run one experimental batch of one of our "juicy" NEIPAs. That would be interesting.
        Last edited by TGTimm; 02-14-2019, 02:23 PM.
        Timm Turrentine

        Brewerywright,
        Terminal Gravity Brewing,
        Enterprise. Oregon.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by TGTimm View Post
          I'm trying to get the brewers to run one experimental batch of one of our "juicy" NEIPAs. That would be interesting.
          As long as you are creating a stable haze in the brewhouse and the cellar, they spin beautifully. Reduces the yeast load in package to basically zero, cuts conditioning time to almost zero, and makes the aroma really pop.

          Click image for larger version

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          • #20
            Thanks, Tony. I'll pass that on.

            Nice pic!
            Timm Turrentine

            Brewerywright,
            Terminal Gravity Brewing,
            Enterprise. Oregon.

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            • #21
              finings

              I will mention, just for the sake of argument, that you can buy an awful lot of fining agents for the $80K the spinner costs....just sayin'. ha
              Larry Horwitz

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Larry Horwitz View Post
                I will mention, just for the sake of argument, that you can buy an awful lot of fining agents for the $80K the spinner costs....just sayin'. ha
                Lets do some quick and simple maths...Here in Australia a 50L keg of cheap beer is worth AU$250. We get a minimum of 100L of beer extra per batch using a centrifuge. Brew 7 batches a week = $3500 which in turn equels to $182 000 a year (of coarse not profit). Can you imagine what you save brewing even more? We are not even talking about more consistent clarity etc. 😉

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Gbbc View Post
                  Lets do some quick and simple maths...Here in Australia a 50L keg of cheap beer is worth AU$250. We get a minimum of 100L of beer extra per batch using a centrifuge. Brew 7 batches a week = $3500 which in turn equels to $182 000 a year (of coarse not profit). Can you imagine what you save brewing even more? We are not even talking about more consistent clarity etc. ��
                  Not to mention that you can shave at least a day or two off conditioning time, which means over the course of a year you can turn a tank an extra time or two, multiplied by however many tanks you have in your cellar...

                  The chief benefit of a centrifuge is not clarity; it is increased throughput, yield, and labor efficiency

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                  • #24
                    kids today!

                    Originally posted by TonyT View Post
                    Not to mention that you can shave at least a day or two off conditioning time, which means over the course of a year you can turn a tank an extra time or two, multiplied by however many tanks you have in your cellar...

                    The chief benefit of a centrifuge is not clarity; it is increased throughput, yield, and labor efficiency
                    Man, you guys bought that sales pitch hook, line, and sinker! Ha.

                    For a small micro brewery, especially one that it tight on capitol, there are Waaaaaaay better ways to spend your money IMO.Anyone on this forum with a Brew 80 that is actually maxed out on capacity? When I say maxed out I mean turning ALL of your tanks right on 14 or 28 days no mater the day of the week or shift (assuming the beer is ready). There are plenty of ways to increase your capacity that are good brewing practice and don't have the capex cost of spinner. How about ensuring the correct healthy yeast pitch every time? That one thing alone has as much to do with the turn time of your tanks as just about anything you do in a brewery. Shaving two days off of your aging time has other consequences that we as brewers also shouldn't forget.

                    New fermenters are pretty cheap these days. Adding to your cellar makes more sense IMOfor a small brewer. A new 120 us barrel fermenter is about $35k, and can get you an additional 1K-2K bbls per year (as an example). It also doesn't require $3K-5K in maintenance every couple of years. As far as dollars vs capacity, that seems to me to be a much better investment.

                    To be clear, I'm not a hater. Spinners certainly have there place in a modern production brewery. My point is, it's not a binary problem. It's a tool like any other. Right for some projects, not the best choice for others. Don't get sucked in by the equipment fashion of the day. Do the hard work of establishing your needs and finding the right fit....and if you need one, or just think they're cool, get one (cool is a legit reson Just be honest about why you chose one!
                    Larry Horwitz

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                    • #25
                      I have ZERO opinion on centrifuges, cause I have no business commenting... but I do like Larry’s words and reasoning.

                      JR
                      Jeremy Reed
                      Co-Founder and President, assistant brewer, amateur electrician, plumber, welder, refrigeration tech, and intermediately swell fella
                      The North of 48 Brewing Company
                      Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

                      www.no48.ca

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