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keg cleaning couplers are different than regular couplers

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  • TGTimm
    replied
    I hadn't noticed that, but then, I never did the comparison. I'm more worried about CIP and foaming issues.

    It's amazing how fast the chrome plating on the brass fittings goes.

    Leave a comment:


  • lhall
    replied
    Yeah, I agree on all stainless for your draft system. Just for kicks, try your favorite IPA or pale ale first through a stainless coupler and faucet, and then through one with exposed brass parts. The taste difference is pretty noticeable and not good.

    Leave a comment:


  • TGTimm
    replied
    A quick note: We've gone with all SS tavern heads, too, as the kind of corrosion shown in Linus' picture will occur from line-cleaning chemicals, leaving a rough, hard-to sanitize surface exposed to our product. The SS tavern heads pay for themselves by lasting nearly forever and helping make sure we're always serving the best draught possible.

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  • sbradt
    replied
    Wash/Fill couplers

    Linus,

    Thanks for that nice PSA! A lot of people go through the same experience, assuming that a coupler is a coupler is a coupler, when in fact there is a very specific set of designs for these. And that difference goes a bit beyond the second poster's suggestion to simply remove the liquid side check valve. Key elements are:

    No Pressure relief valve on the gas port. Why? Because in wash operations these PRVs get destroyed by the cleaning chemicals, causing hazardous leakage of chemicals. In filling applications, the gas port becomes a liquid contact area and the nooks and crannies in the PRVs become a potential contamination site, as they are not designed for liquids.

    Increased bore in the gas port. Since this is the drainage port when washing kegs, maximizing flow is critical to good performance and reducing the chance of pooling in the keg during the wash cycle or incomplete drainage at any point. This can cause kegs to be rejected by many keg washers.

    100% stainless steel construction, resulting in contact areas that are suitable for exposure to the commonly used cleaning chemicals and sanitizers. As can be seen in Linus' picture, a plated brass component does not fare well in this environment!

    All of these features make these couplers far more suitable to filling applications as well.

    Cheers!

    Leave a comment:


  • TGTimm
    replied
    Been there, done that.

    Tim: The cleaning couplers, in addition to not having PRVs, are about twice the ID of a tavern head. Most automated keg washers will see the extra back-pressure as a fault.

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  • TiminOz
    replied
    Originally posted by lhall View Post
    We recently had a problem with our MiniKing keg cleaner not completing its cycles, and I found that one of our cellarman had noticed the keg coupler leaking, and had swapped it out with a spare keg coupler we had from our taproom. He didn't realize that there was a difference between the couplers made for keg cleaning and regular couplers. So I thought I'd show some pictures of the difference in case anyone else had the same issue down the road.

    [ATTACH]64709[/ATTACH]

    This is the right one. The parts are made of stainless, there is no pressure relief port, and the interior of the coupler body has been machined out to allow for more flow out of the gas-out port.

    [ATTACH]64710[/ATTACH]

    This is a pretty cheap keg coupler not designed for keg cleaning. The spear is made of chrome-plated brass, there is a pressure relief port, and the interior of the coupler body has not been machined out. On our keg washer, this coupler will cause problems with the cycle completing in time, and you also don't get enough flow to adequately wash the keg.
    That is just a cheap coupler. The big difference is that you need to remove the check valve inside the coupler for use on a keg washer. This is using a standard Micro Matic (D) or (A) coupler.

    Leave a comment:


  • keg cleaning couplers are different than regular couplers

    We recently had a problem with our MiniKing keg cleaner not completing its cycles, and I found that one of our cellarman had noticed the keg coupler leaking, and had swapped it out with a spare keg coupler we had from our taproom. He didn't realize that there was a difference between the couplers made for keg cleaning and regular couplers. So I thought I'd show some pictures of the difference in case anyone else had the same issue down the road.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	cleaning coupler.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	88.8 KB
ID:	196302

    This is the right one. The parts are made of stainless, there is no pressure relief port, and the interior of the coupler body has been machined out to allow for more flow out of the gas-out port.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	noncleaning coupler.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	92.0 KB
ID:	196303

    This is a pretty cheap keg coupler not designed for keg cleaning. The spear is made of chrome-plated brass, there is a pressure relief port, and the interior of the coupler body has not been machined out. On our keg washer, this coupler will cause problems with the cycle completing in time, and you also don't get enough flow to adequately wash the keg.
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