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Wiring for 110v CPE 1hp 1ph pump

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  • Wiring for 110v CPE 1hp 1ph pump

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    I'm in the process of wiring our new pump. I want to check with others in the forum re: wiring. It's going on a 20 amp dedicated breaker. I cut off one end of a GFCI extension cord and plan to hard wire that directly to the low voltage wires on the pump.
    On the GFCI plug I have:
    Black, White and Green (3) wires
    On the pump I have 7 wires - pictured and labeled below in the image .
    Per the wiring diagram on the pump I've connected Black to P1 (the black wire) and White to T2,T4&T5
    Is this correct?
    Where Does the green (ground) connect to on the pump?
    What do you make of the idea of wiring directly to the GFCI extension? From there I will run a 12 gauge extension to the dedicated 20 Amp outlet. Should I bump that breaker up to a single 30 amp breaker?
    The local electrician lives far away here (Costa Rica) and I'm not sure he knows the best way to do this. Thanks.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Wire out

    Originally posted by PerraHermosa View Post
    [ATTACH]28188[/ATTACH]

    I'm in the process of wiring our new pump. I want to check with others in the forum re: wiring. It's going on a 20 amp dedicated breaker. I cut off one end of a GFCI extension cord and plan to hard wire that directly to the low voltage wires on the pump.
    On the GFCI plug I have:
    Black, White and Green (3) wires
    On the pump I have 7 wires - pictured and labeled below in the image .
    Per the wiring diagram on the pump I've connected Black to P1 (the black wire) and White to T2,T4&T5
    Is this correct?
    Where Does the green (ground) connect to on the pump?
    What do you make of the idea of wiring directly to the GFCI extension? From there I will run a 12 gauge extension to the dedicated 20 Amp outlet. Should I bump that breaker up to a single 30 amp breaker?
    The local electrician lives far away here (Costa Rica) and I'm not sure he knows the best way to do this. Thanks.
    First thing. I would take that GCFI device and throw it in the trash. It will be nothing but trouble in that close coupled wet environment.
    You need a proper water tight cord grip to pass your wire through using one of the knock outs on the terminal box.
    You need 12 AWG wire for this application.
    You need to follow the diagram for BROWN, ORANGE, and RED wires as well. That is a junction for the stator windings.
    You do not need a 30A breaker.
    You need to check and set rotation immediately before you bring it into service. If you have it running backwards it will overload and destroy the motor windings more than likely.
    There should be a green ground screw in the terminal box. If not you can use one of the terminal box screws. Put a yellow ring terminal on your green wire for this job.
    You need to check running amps across the duty range you will be running it before you call it good.
    Warren Turner
    Industrial Engineering Technician
    HVACR-Electrical Systems Specialist
    Moab Brewery
    The Thought Police are Attempting to Suppress Free Speech and Sugar coat everything. This is both Cowardice and Treason given to their own kind.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Warren. Just to clarify: if I were to complete the wiring with the GFCI unit, I'd wire the green ground on the plug end to the green nut in the pump box, correct?
      I'm unclear on what to do with the other three wires.
      Based on your advice, I will replace that yellow GFCI unit with 3 feet of 12 gauge 3-wire and put a male three prong plug on the opposite end. I'll then attach that to 50 feet of 12 gauge extension cord.
      Does this sound like a better plan? I guess I could also just cut one end and wire the extension cord directly on to the pump...

      How does one check and set rotation? Hook it up and briefly run water through it?
      Gracias,
      Ryan

      Originally posted by Starcat View Post
      First thing. I would take that GCFI device and throw it in the trash. It will be nothing but trouble in that close coupled wet environment.
      You need a proper water tight cord grip to pass your wire through using one of the knock outs on the terminal box.
      You need 12 AWG wire for this application.
      You need to follow the diagram for BROWN, ORANGE, and RED wires as well. That is a junction for the stator windings.
      You do not need a 30A breaker.
      You need to check and set rotation immediately before you bring it into service. If you have it running backwards it will overload and destroy the motor windings more than likely.
      There should be a green ground screw in the terminal box. If not you can use one of the terminal box screws. Put a yellow ring terminal on your green wire for this job.
      You need to check running amps across the duty range you will be running it before you call it good.
      Last edited by PerraHermosa; 11-25-2015, 02:59 PM.

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      • #4
        Looking for resources online for centrifugal pump wiring videos and/or tutorials. Not having a lot of luck. Any suggestions for links?

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        • #5
          If you are so keen on GFCI, install GFCI outlet. If you are not sure how to wire your pump, hire an electrician to be on the safe side.

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          • #6
            Further to that.....

            I'd NOT install any plug within 3 feet of a pump. That is just enough to get into trouble with. Too long to hang from the pump, and too short to get out of the local wet environment associated with running a pump. Wire directly one end of proper SO Cord to the motor box, through a watertight gland per Warren. Other end of the wire could be a plug for an outlet. Make it an outdoor, water resistant box, receptacle, and cover. And I agree: get rid of that GFCI. Install a dedicated string of GFCI outlets in your brewhouse. Required by code anyway. Should be 20A maximum breaker if using 12 gauge wire. I believe that wire nuts are far inferior to a well made crimp connector. I wouldn't use wire nuts anywhere, but they are especially ill-suited for a pump motor box. In some countries wire nuts are not legal for commercial applications. For checking your rotation, running water through it will NOT assure you that it's the correct direction. Examine principles of centrifugal pump operation to see that there is an easy way to tell which way to run the impeller. It's in the direction of discharge on most small centrifugal pumps. Good luck.
            Last edited by gitchegumee; 11-26-2015, 10:22 AM.
            Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--

            Comment


            • #7
              Just to add to the very good advise given in the above posts....

              If you are thinking about running an extension cord from a wall mounted receptacle (If not already installed, I'd place it a minimum of 2' above the brewery floor), you will have to account for voltage drop due to the wire size of the extension cord. I would also install a receptacle and male connector on extension cords that are twist-loc.

              https://www.platt.com/platt-electric...px?zpid=161747

              https://www.platt.com/platt-electric...px?zpid=161638

              Wire sizing chart and calculator for length of run, voltage drop for a given wire size here... http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm

              As stated above, Cheers and Good Luck.

              Comment


              • #8
                26 Nov.15

                Brown, Orange, and Red show to be connected together. That means you tie them all together under a wirenut or connector of choice.
                Rotation can be checked by looking at the motor fan from the back and bumping the motor briefly, or with some pumps you can see the impeller with the top tri clamp fitting left off. Wet it rather than spinning the mechanical seal dry.
                The other tenets given are good as well.
                Typically you want a decent length cord on your pump.
                Warren Turner
                Industrial Engineering Technician
                HVACR-Electrical Systems Specialist
                Moab Brewery
                The Thought Police are Attempting to Suppress Free Speech and Sugar coat everything. This is both Cowardice and Treason given to their own kind.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Starcat View Post
                  Brown, Orange, and Red show to be connected together. That means you tie them all together under a wirenut or connector of choice.
                  Rotation can be checked by looking at the motor fan from the back and bumping the motor briefly, or with some pumps you can see the impeller with the top tri clamp fitting left off. Wet it rather than spinning the mechanical seal dry.
                  The other tenets given are good as well.
                  Typically you want a decent length cord on your pump.
                  I think he'll find the pump will run backwards...the label says CCW-OPE, and looking at the pump orientation in that photo, it should actually rotate CW-OPE.

                  To reverse it, swap the Red (T8) and Black (T5) so that Red (T8) is connected to White (T2) and Yellow (T4), which are connected to your white neutral. Black (T5) will be connected to Brown (P2) and Orange (T3).

                  I like to use non-insulated crimp-on ring terminals (but you need a good crimper, otherwise solder the terminal on). Then I use small screws and lock nuts to attach the terminals together.

                  When taping the bolted connection, the first wrap is with a waterproof oil/wax impregnated tape (hard to find, so this is optional). Then wrap with self vulcanizing rubber tape (3M is the best). Lap each wrap 50%. Some self-vulcanizing tapes have a backing you peel off, but newer ones don't. Make sure you stretch the tape as you wrap; this "activates" the tape to it vulcanizes together. Finally wrap the connection with good PVC electrical tape (also 3M, preferably).

                  I know this sounds like a lot of extra work, but motors have a lot of inrush current, and there is a lot of vibration when they're running, so you want good connections. The air compressor at my old shop had so much inrush current you could hear the wires rattling in the conduit due to the magnetic field produced by the current when it started. Sure, it's a different application and a lot bigger motor, but I've fixed lots of pumps that had crappy connections, and very few that were made up correctly.

                  Is that thermal protector sealed with a rubber diaphragm of some sort? Looks like a leak-point if not.

                  Regards,
                  Mike Sharp

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thank you, really. I appreciate the various feedback. I got the pump working today, but I've also been referred to a local pump specialist, so I'm not putting it into action until he signs off and helps me seal it up properly. Done a lot of back and forth on short wire + extension vs. long wire with plug and have gone with the former, however will see what the specialist has to say. Also, it seemed to slow down today as I ran it, but I may just be paranoid. Thinking about upsizing your nano pump like me? Think about upsizing all your ports and hoses. I'm still running on 1/2" silicone hose w/various size port sizes from 3/8" dip-tube to 1" dump/fill port on the 5 BBL uni-tanks... Pandora's box here...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ok, pump tecnician came, approved the wiring job and left. It runs wired for 110. Foolishly, we didn't run it connected to the spray ball in the uni tank while he was here. It runs but the ball barely turns. It spouts off about 6-8" on each side. It's weak, not hitting the walls. so back to the drawing board. Any thoughts? Are my 1/2" hose lines to blame? But wouldn't that just create more pressure/spinning?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Pump PSIG

                        Originally posted by PerraHermosa View Post
                        Ok, pump tecnician came, approved the wiring job and left. It runs wired for 110. Foolishly, we didn't run it connected to the spray ball in the uni tank while he was here. It runs but the ball barely turns. It spouts off about 6-8" on each side. It's weak, not hitting the walls. so back to the drawing board. Any thoughts? Are my 1/2" hose lines to blame? But wouldn't that just create more pressure/spinning?
                        The pump only puts out a specific GPM at a specific PSI. If the ball is rated to a higher PSI, then it will not spray to the walls.
                        If the ball is fixed and can't be changed, then you need more PSI.

                        Also, if your water supply to the pump cannot produce enough water to satisfy the pump, it will not have enough volume to keep up.

                        It's like an open water hose, if you put your finger over the end, it will spay harder and farther as long as the water pressure is constant.

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                        • #13
                          years later closing the loop on the thread

                          just came across this a couple years later - the 1/2" hose was too small for the intake. We converted to 1.5" hoses and solved the problem... well, that one anyway... thanks to the other brewers for all the help over the years.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Since this is back up, I'll add one thing: The only place for a GFCI in a brewery is in the circuit breaker box. GFCI breakers can handle higher loads than any outlet or cord, and every outlet in the brewery should be protected by a GFCI breaker.
                            Timm Turrentine

                            Brewerywright,
                            Terminal Gravity Brewing,
                            Enterprise. Oregon.

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