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Coolbot cooler vents into tap room - too noisy!

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  • augiedoggy
    replied
    Originally posted by Starcat View Post
    Timm you are absolutely correct. The Condenser on this type of unit strictly rejects heat to the space its in, while the evaporator condenses water within the " conditioned space."
    Water always migrates into the conditioned space. Period.
    ON the subject of attempting to room off a heat rejection device, this is another attempt at a bad idea.
    The condenser must reject the " heat of compression " plus the BTUs removed from the evaporator side of the cycle. It always a bad idea to force this type of system about 90F on the condenser side.
    A correctly installed Medium Temperature Refrigeration unit with a remote condenser is the best way in many cases, and its not necssarily that costly to do it right the first time depending on what kind of connections may be at hand within that trade in your area. The guys who really know how to do it correctly, and well are a disappearing breed.
    The one thing is with Window AC units however, that many are designed to run the water from the evap back into the condenser section, where it then wets the lower part of the condenser and then also drains out the back of the cabinet. As thus, its not the right kind of machine for medium temp duty in many respects, although its being " forced " to do so. This could be the answer to your query.
    In our case our space is a very old building with building attached to both sides and the rear of the building is over 60ft away from the cooler. and through a 30ft crawl space behind the rear of the basement.
    We are not allowed to put anything on the roof or drill any holes in the roof at this point.

    the original inspector had no issues with the window ac units. The electrical inspector does.

    I realize there will be heat outside the cooler which 3/4 of the year will be a good thing as we had to wear jackets while building it since the basement is so cold during all seasons but summer.
    Last edited by augiedoggy; 06-16-2018, 05:21 AM.

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  • Johnson_Thermal
    replied
    Referring to Warren's last paragraph, the term is "slinger ring" air conditioner if you want to look up if your unit does this.


    Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Johnson_Thermal; 06-13-2018, 10:47 PM.

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  • Starcat
    replied
    Condensers....

    Originally posted by TGTimm View Post
    Would someone please explain to me how the hot side of an air conditioner/chiller could possibly cause high humidity? I guess if you have pools of water on the floor, the heat will put more of it into the air, but otherwise....

    Or are you all pouring/spraying water over the condenser to try and get better performance? That would certainly humidify the space.
    Timm you are absolutely correct. The Condenser on this type of unit strictly rejects heat to the space its in, while the evaporator condenses water within the " conditioned space."
    Water always migrates into the conditioned space. Period.
    ON the subject of attempting to room off a heat rejection device, this is another attempt at a bad idea.
    The condenser must reject the " heat of compression " plus the BTUs removed from the evaporator side of the cycle. It always a bad idea to force this type of system about 90F on the condenser side.
    A correctly installed Medium Temperature Refrigeration unit with a remote condenser is the best way in many cases, and its not necssarily that costly to do it right the first time depending on what kind of connections may be at hand within that trade in your area. The guys who really know how to do it correctly, and well are a disappearing breed.
    The one thing is with Window AC units however, that many are designed to run the water from the evap back into the condenser section, where it then wets the lower part of the condenser and then also drains out the back of the cabinet. As thus, its not the right kind of machine for medium temp duty in many respects, although its being " forced " to do so. This could be the answer to your query.
    Last edited by Starcat; 06-11-2018, 02:21 PM.

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  • TGTimm
    replied
    Would someone please explain to me how the hot side of an air conditioner/chiller could possibly cause high humidity? I guess if you have pools of water on the floor, the heat will put more of it into the air, but otherwise....

    Or are you all pouring/spraying water over the condenser to try and get better performance? That would certainly humidify the space.
    Last edited by TGTimm; 06-11-2018, 01:14 PM.

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  • backslope
    replied
    I have a 40'x40' basement, with a 20'x20' cooler in it. Two 24k air conditioners run off separate coolbots. No humidity issues, a little bit of heat but not much, high 60s in the basement. We ran the coolbots for a month with no significant heat/humidity issues. After that month we added some commercial kitchen equipment: an enormous ice machine, 3 fridges, and a large freezer. Those additions made the basement super hot (in the 80s), so we put in a mini-split air conditioner to cool down the space, as well as a set of air exchanger fans to keep air circulating. Now it is back to high 60s in there.

    Can you just turn on your coolbot, let it run for a week, and then invite the inspector back to see if there are any issues? After a week you should know if it is an issue or not.

    Good luck.

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  • TGTimm
    replied
    Originally posted by augiedoggy View Post
    can you or anyone with one of these venting indoors tell me how much heat and humidity they produce? our local inspector wont give us the green light now that we built it even though he was previously ok with it because he thinks the ac unit on the cooler in our basement will create too much heat and humidity? I believe they turn humidity into the form of condensation but dont create it myself... the basement area is about 700 sq ft and the cooler is 9x10 and we have the lg 24,500btu unit.
    Condensation occurs at the evaporator--the cold side. The condensate is removed from the air, so it actually dehumidifies the cooled space. You should have a catchtray and drain for the condensate so it isn't a problem. On the hot side, there is no condensate and no way it can contribute to humidity. It will throw a lot of heat, and will be noisy.

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  • augiedoggy
    replied
    can you or anyone with one of these venting indoors tell me how much heat and humidity they produce? our local inspector wont give us the green light now that we built it even though he was previously ok with it because he thinks the ac unit on the cooler in our basement will create too much heat and humidity? I believe they turn humidity into the form of condensation but dont create it myself... the basement area is about 700 sq ft and the cooler is 9x10 and we have the lg 24,500btu unit.

    Leave a comment:


  • somenerve
    replied
    It’s an LG 15K BTU window unit.

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  • mswebb
    replied
    Originally posted by Northernbrews View Post
    Just curious what AC unit you had used?
    airconditionercanada had ComfortAire models which we've used successfully. smaller units for fermenter temp rooms and the biggest 115V unit we could get for an 8 by 10 3C cold room. We've even managed to keep a 6 by 10 trailer cold at festivals using the smaller units but they will freeze up. Yes, they will all be noisy.

    As for the original poster, why not switch to a mini-split type ac unit and get the condenser placed in a better location (like outside).

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  • Northernbrews
    replied
    Just curious what AC unit you had used?

    Leave a comment:


  • somenerve
    started a topic Coolbot cooler vents into tap room - too noisy!

    Coolbot cooler vents into tap room - too noisy!

    Well this definitely belongs in the “Stupid Stuff” category...

    Built our serving cooler with the Coolbot-operated AC venting into the taproom. Got everything finished and hooked up and turned on the AC only to discover that IT’S REALLY FREAKING LOUD!!! Like WAY more noisy than I want our cozy little chill taproom to have to endure (yeah I know - what did you expect dumba$$?)

    Does anybody have any ideas on how to attenuate the noise? There is enough space that I could probably build a small room around it but I’d love to find a less involved / obtrusive solution if possible. Has anybody else dealt with this sort of problem?
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