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  • Yeast Calculators?

    Is there a calculator available somewhere to help me get off on my feet? I have always done 5gal batches, and now I am opening a 2BBL brewery. I read through the yeast resource sectin as required by forum rules but did not answer my question, below is the excerpt. Id does not appear to take in account the volume......

    https://discussions.probrewer.com/sh...ontent-section

    "Example: For a beer at 10°P or 1.040 gravity (to convert gravity in Plato degrees, divide the last 2 decimals by 4 (i.e. 40/4 = 10). Cell concentration to be inoculated: 10x1x106 cells ml-1 = 1×107 cells ml-1"

  • #2
    answered my own question

    Answered my own question


    Screen Shot 2020-03-06 at 9.54.40 PM by Jeremy Boucher, on Flickr

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    • #3
      Actually, this can't be correct

      this cant be correct....

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      • #4
        Not sure who your yeast supplier is, but they should be able to give you some advice, all the professional yeast labs I am familiar with are great. I use Wyeast, and they are very helpful with starting pitch rates, and with every other question I have. But, from previous conversations, I will assume you are going to be repitching yeast without a lab environment to do cell counts and viability tests, so here is my advice from my experience. It is worth exactly what you are paying for it.

        Order a starter through your supplier. For me, with wyeast, that has been .5 Liter per bbl for an average gravity beer(so for you that would be a 1 Liter pitch for a healthy fermentation for your 2bbl system.) That goes directly into a blonde ale, or another light starter. As I repitch yeast I am not often doing cell counts, I have found a liquid quantity that works well for me for each batch. Quantities differ, strain to strain, batch to batch, accounting for yeast health. But roughly, for a 7bbl batch I will (over)pitch 8ish gallons of yeast slurry. Granted, this amount is a direct transfer, cone to cone, not set aside in a yeast brink. And it is mildly foamy, so it settles down to less than that full amount when I do tests and let it settle.

        But, the point of this is, I am able to replicate my process well, beer to beer, batch to batch, and can turn out consistent beers. I know of several other breweries within my region that do even less yeast management than I do that can still turn out excellent, consistent beers. A lab is great. Cell counts are great. But at your 2bbl scale, if you can figure out a relatively consistent system that turns out reliably solid and consistent beers, don't over think it.

        I hope this helps you work through this. There are sharper minds out there than mine who may have better advice, but this works for me.

        Good luck.
        Last edited by backslope; 03-07-2020, 10:26 AM.

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        • #5
          commercial brewing videos

          Jasper gives some great info on commercial brewing process. His videos can be helpful in all aspects of brewing.

          https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...cWhXDt8R0W1Ttf

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          • #6
            Slurry Yeast Calculation

            According to my calculations, you only need 3.39 Liters of slurry yeast.

            Parameter Value Unit
            Batch Size: 2.83 Hectoliter (75 gal)
            Wort SG: 12 ° Plato (1.048)
            Pitching rate: 1,000,000 Million cells/ ml / ° Plato
            Slurry Concentration: 1 Billion cells / ml
            Pitching Volume: 3.396 Liters

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Brwd.By.Boucher View Post
              this cant be correct....
              You have the 'Estimate Viability from Age' ticked, telling it you have a 9 year old starter, which is why you're getting the massive pitch rate.
              Jeff Rosenmeier (Rosie)
              Chairman of the Beer
              Lovibonds Brewery Ltd
              Henley-on-Thames, Englandshire
              W: [url]www.lovibonds.com[/url]
              F: LovibondsBrewery
              T: @Lovibonds

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              • #8
                Dry yeast pitch rate calculator

                If you are using dry yeast, it is best to use a calculator optimized for dry yeast.
                https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/en/...te-calculator/

                Most calculators are designed for liquid yeast and using them for dry yeast can result in significant overpitching.
                https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/wp-...-Viability.pdf
                Lallemand is a global leader in the development, production and marketing of yeast, bacteria and specialty ingredients.

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                • #9
                  Input and one more question...

                  Thank you all for the input, love this place, first brew day should be the 23rd only a little over a week away, I will let you know how it goes...

                  1) how much oxygen do I hit the wort with as it moves from the BK they the plate chiller and into the FB?

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                  • #10
                    Eric

                    This calculator (dry yeast - https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/en/...te-calculator/) must be wrong.

                    London yeast
                    2000 litres
                    1048 OG

                    And it tells me I need 26.2 tonnes yeast!!
                    dick

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                    • #11
                      Aha - put in 1048, when I put in 48, it gives 1.175 kg - far more sensible.

                      Sorry about the previous comment, but it does suggest the format of SG entry should be made clear.
                      dick

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                      • #12
                        OK - third attempt - when I calculated the grams / kg / tonnes I still got a silly figure. 1.048 gives a far more sensible result - 1200 g.

                        Shame my brain obviously isn't working - and no, I'm not affected (knowingly) by the bug
                        dick

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                        • #13
                          Oxygen?

                          I'd use filtered air and hit repitched liquid yeast at normal pitching rates with as much as you can push through your oxygenation stone. You will not overoxygenate with air. You won't pay much for it either. I've never found a reason to use oxygen as opposed to air. Air requires NO measurement. Oxygen can be overdosed, and it is difficult to measure quantitatively. You will have to repeat every dose with same conditions and then dial in the correct amount to get what you are looking for batch after batch. If you are using dry yeast, no need for air or oxygen at all.
                          Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by dick murton View Post
                            OK - third attempt - when I calculated the grams / kg / tonnes I still got a silly figure. 1.048 gives a far more sensible result - 1200 g.

                            Shame my brain obviously isn't working - and no, I'm not affected (knowingly) by the bug
                            Thanks for the input Dick, the standard format for SG is using a decimal, but it's true that many people omit the decimal as a shorthand. I will put in a request to change this the next time we update the calculator.
                            Lallemand is a global leader in the development, production and marketing of yeast, bacteria and specialty ingredients.

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