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Split Mash Questions

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  • eoconnor101
    replied
    I've only double mashed once, I did boil the first runnings because I was brewing an RIS and wanted some carmelization. I split everything right in half and ran out the first runnings and then sparged a little bit. I have an HLT so I had my strike water for the second mash ready as mentioned above, total brew day was about 9 hours with this method but I did a 90 minute full boil and our knockout takes 45 minutes.

    Incidentally the second runnings made a good dopplebock/Schwarz hybrid, just steeped some de husked carafa to add color back and added a little DME and sugar to boost the gravity back up. This was just for giggles though, didn't make a full batches worth.

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  • OPBrewCO
    replied
    Why start boil on First Runnings

    Originally posted by rudge75 View Post
    If you have a hot liquor tank or an empty fermenter, it's an easy proposition to double mash, and single boil.

    1. Heat up as much water as you can in your kettle the night before
    2. mash in early
    3. add more water to your kettle if needed and boil
    4. slide your kettle water into your HLT or empty fermenter
    5. Collect a little over half your runnings from the first mash and bring to a boil
    6. continue boiling while you clean out and mash in the second batch of grain
    7. collect the remainder of your wort,
    8. Then add your hops and count your boil time, running off as normal.

    Our total turn around on a double mash day is around 8 1/2 hours with this method.

    Your recipe really depends on how efficient your brewhouse is, since your efficiency will drop over larger grain volumes, you may need to adjust your recipe to hit your target. We generally find this does a nice job of doing bigger beers on our woefully undersized mash tun.

    Why are you boiling the first mash? Why not wait to start the boil until you've collected the full volume?

    Leave a comment:


  • jwalts
    replied
    If you don't properly tailor your water chemistry to each brew, mashing a half batch with 0% specialty malt and another half batch with ~50% specialty malt will result in at least one of them being fubar. At the very least, do what Bham Brewer says.

    Joe

    Leave a comment:


  • rudge75
    replied
    If you have a hot liquor tank or an empty fermenter, it's an easy proposition to double mash, and single boil.

    1. Heat up as much water as you can in your kettle the night before
    2. mash in early
    3. add more water to your kettle if needed and boil
    4. slide your kettle water into your HLT or empty fermenter
    5. Collect a little over half your runnings from the first mash and bring to a boil
    6. continue boiling while you clean out and mash in the second batch of grain
    7. collect the remainder of your wort,
    8. Then add your hops and count your boil time, running off as normal.

    Our total turn around on a double mash day is around 8 1/2 hours with this method.

    Your recipe really depends on how efficient your brewhouse is, since your efficiency will drop over larger grain volumes, you may need to adjust your recipe to hit your target. We generally find this does a nice job of doing bigger beers on our woefully undersized mash tun.

    Leave a comment:


  • wailingguitar
    replied
    When faced with a situation like this, I simply split it straight in half... say, if my normal knockout volume is 30 bbl, brew it in 2 x 15 bbl batches with all the ingredients divided evenly.

    Leave a comment:


  • brewmaster 2011
    replied
    I recommend splitting the beer over 2 straight brew days. it will help with efficiency of the brew and save your back when trying to mix that much grain.

    Leave a comment:


  • rbrewhead
    started a topic Split Mash Questions

    Split Mash Questions

    I have an Imperial Milk Stout I am brewing up and the MLT is not big enough for the entire grain bill so I need to do a split mash. My grain bill is 2,805lbs, and I can safely get up to 1,700lbs or so into the MLT at a time. What gravity and or volume should I collect to for each mash? Should I try and boil down the first mashes running’s? I was thinking of mashing 28 bags of two-row for the first mash and then 14 bags two-row and specialty malts for the second.

    Any thoughts or experiences with split mashing?
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