Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mixing strains of yeast

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Michael_L
    replied
    Scottish Lager

    I was doing a pilot batch of an 80 pence Scottish, and accidentally mixed a lager pack of yeast in with my other Scottish Ale. At the ale fermentation temps, the lager strain really kicked in, even though it was out matched 3 to 1. I decided that since the lager sulfur smell seemed to be so strong, I would lager it after primary. After 3 weeks, I kegged and carbonated. The best dark lager I've ever brewed! I'm going to try and replicate on a bigger scale now!

    Leave a comment:


  • Amit
    replied
    Warmer fermentation risking contamination

    I have serious issue in my Brewery thou... I made 3 batches of Hefe and they all got contaminated with LAB, this has not happenend to me before even when I ferment at 64ish to get a good balance of clove and banana. Just made a new batch of Hefe today planning to ferment it colder to avoid LAB growth..won't exceed 54F. I am using WB 06 Fermentis suggests colder fermentation will enhance clove and warmer fermentations give out more banana. Fermentis also gives the analysis of bacterial presence <5/ml, so does warmer fermentation enchanced the growth? Also got lot of sulfur in one of the batches at 64, so cropped a whole lot of yeast and waiting for it to clear out in conditioning.

    Leave a comment:


  • einhorn
    replied
    Originally posted by StarCityBrewing View Post
    Thanks for the info!
    As far as carbonation, would you recommend priming and kegging to let the beer naturally carbonate? or just kegging and force carbing with co2? I know hefes need at least 3 to 4 volumes, I'm aiming for around 3.5 to 3.7
    Just my opinion: I would always let all beers ferment out completely and force carb. Seems like a more perfect science.
    Last edited by einhorn; 05-04-2013, 12:51 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Amit
    replied
    Warmer fermentation risking contamination

    I have serious issue in my Brewery thou... I made 3 batches of Hefe and they all got contaminated with LAB, this has not happenend to me before even when I ferment at 64ish to get a good balance of clove and banana. Just made a new batch of Hefe today planning to ferment it colder to avoid LAB growth..won't exceed 54F. I am using WB 06 Fermentis suggests colder fermentation will enhance clove and warmer fermentations give out more banana. Fermentis also gives the analysis of bacterial presence <5/ml, so does warmer fermentation enchanced the growth? Also got lot of sulfur in one of the batches at 64, so cropped a whole lot of yeast and waiting for it to clear out in conditioning.

    Leave a comment:


  • StarCityBrewing
    replied
    Originally posted by einhorn View Post
    Don't sweat the temp fall. With the two stains you're going to get a Frankenstein brew anyway. I personally ferment at 70 for banana phenols, which I like. As far as sulfur goes, let the beer warm up to 70 towards the end. If it's still around, don't worry it generally subsides with some conditioning time.
    Thanks for the info!
    As far as carbonation, would you recommend priming and kegging to let the beer naturally carbonate? or just kegging and force carbing with co2? I know hefes need at least 3 to 4 volumes, I'm aiming for around 3.5 to 3.7

    Leave a comment:


  • einhorn
    replied
    Don't sweat the temp fall. With the two stains you're going to get a Frankenstein brew anyway. I personally ferment at 70 for banana phenols, which I like. As far as sulfur goes, let the beer warm up to 70 towards the end. If it's still around, don't worry it generally subsides with some conditioning time.

    Leave a comment:


  • StarCityBrewing
    replied
    Originally posted by einhorn View Post
    From what I know, ester/phenol development depends a lot on fermentation temp. Whatever happens, I would love to hear your results!
    Today was rather frustrating... I go to check on my Hefe and realize the temp dropped to 66F from my ideal ferment temp of 69F, this must have happened through the night as it got slightly chilly. The thermostat in my partner's apartment doesn't automatically turn on heat or AC as needed. It's set to one or the other... Given the climate here in EKY right now, it's really tough to dial in that perfect temp if you're fermenting without a temp-controlled FV.

    Fermentation is still vigorous and going strong. I'm bringing the temp back up slowly to 69, so things should be okay.

    I read a review on the WLP380. The brewer stated that he got a little sulfur towards the end of the ferment. What could I do to keep the sulfur at a minimum?

    Leave a comment:


  • einhorn
    replied
    Originally posted by StarCityBrewing View Post
    Just brewed a Bavarian Hefe last night and pitched two yeast strains into our 1.044 OG wort: WLP300 and WLP380. We'll see how it goes. I'm hoping for a great aroma of banana AND clove. Will report back as things progress.
    From what I know, ester/phenol development depends a lot on fermentation temp. Whatever happens, I would love to hear your results!

    Leave a comment:


  • StarCityBrewing
    replied
    Originally posted by Amit View Post
    I was wondering if I could pitch in two types of yeast strain together in the Primary. Has anyone got any experience in doing so? I am planning to mix cider (bayanus) and lager yeast. Any ideas as to what I could expect?
    Just brewed a Bavarian Hefe last night and pitched two yeast strains into our 1.044 OG wort: WLP300 and WLP380. We'll see how it goes. I'm hoping for a great aroma of banana AND clove. Will report back as things progress.

    Leave a comment:


  • Amit
    replied
    Trial with mixed strains

    Originally posted by liammckenna View Post
    You can expect a combination of yeast characters. You can also expect that one yeast will dominate over the other. Especially on repitch. You can also expect one strain to influence the other ie. one may produce more acid than the other is used to which may stimulate/stifle vigour etc.

    There are many mixed strains in use in the brewing world.

    Think about doing it sequentially, ie. allow one to start (the weaker, less vigorous strain or the stronger one if you just want a hint of the weaker yeasts character) then pitch the other.

    In order to maintain batch to batch character, effective strain management and measured pitching rate/timing/temperature/pH of addition is critical.

    I've heard of people finishing stronger beers using a wine yeast? Never tried one of these beers but would like to.

    Try it on a small (5 gallon scale) first.

    Pax
    This is interesting, in this case I believe cider yeast being vigorous (Since this yeast is generally used to restart stuck fermentations) can be pitched in a bit late maybe after 2 Plato of fermentation has been finished by lager yeast. Also for pitching rate I am using dry fermentis yeast so I guess pitching in at 2:1 lager : cider ratio should balance the flavors as I don't want the dry sour taste to be dominated by S.bayanus. I have almost no experience brewing at small scale but I guess this one would require a little trail of mixed strains.

    Thanks
    Amit

    Leave a comment:


  • nateo
    replied
    Originally posted by liammckenna View Post
    I've heard of people finishing stronger beers using a wine yeast? Never tried one of these beers but would like to.
    I never really understood that. Most wine yeasts can't effectively ferment maltotriose. I've fermented wort with wine yeasts, and most of them can't touch the complex sugars, and leave the FG very high (notable exception is K1V-1116). I use wine yeasts to make my Flanders Reds at home, because they leave a lot of residual sweetness in wort to balance the acidity. They're also nice to use with Brett strains, since the Brett will eat the complex sugars.

    Leave a comment:


  • liammckenna
    replied
    Originally posted by Amit View Post
    I was wondering if I could pitch in two types of yeast strain together in the Primary. Has anyone got any experience in doing so? I am planning to mix cider (bayanus) and lager yeast. Any ideas as to what I could expect?
    You can expect a combination of yeast characters. You can also expect that one yeast will dominate over the other. Especially on repitch. You can also expect one strain to influence the other ie. one may produce more acid than the other is used to which may stimulate/stifle vigour etc.

    There are many mixed strains in use in the brewing world.

    Think about doing it sequentially, ie. allow one to start (the weaker, less vigorous strain or the stronger one if you just want a hint of the weaker yeasts character) then pitch the other.

    In order to maintain batch to batch character, effective strain management and measured pitching rate/timing/temperature/pH of addition is critical.

    I've heard of people finishing stronger beers using a wine yeast? Never tried one of these beers but would like to.

    Try it on a small (5 gallon scale) first.

    Pax

    Leave a comment:


  • Amit
    started a topic Mixing strains of yeast

    Mixing strains of yeast

    I was wondering if I could pitch in two types of yeast strain together in the Primary. Has anyone got any experience in doing so? I am planning to mix cider (bayanus) and lager yeast. Any ideas as to what I could expect?
Working...
X