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Is it me, or the WB06? Lots of foaming issues

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  • Is it me, or the WB06? Lots of foaming issues

    Hi all
    I have a Bavarien wheat beer that I brew regulary. I always have foaming issues with it, because it continues to ferment in the bottles/kegs. No matter how much yeast I use, how much Oxigen and how many times I rise the yest in the last days of fermentation, It just won't go lower then 2.0 Plato in the tank.
    Then after a few weeks in a bottle or a keg the Plato goes down to 1.2, and I have huge foaming problems.
    Here is the recipe/process :
    20 HL batch (17 Bbl)
    40% wheat 60% Pilsner
    Oxigen from a sterile compressor through an inline stone after the HEX
    1.5 kilos (3.3 lbs) of WB06, 3 dried Fermentis bricks, sprinkeled on top from the hops port of the Unitank.
    Fermentation at 20C (68F)
    Spunding at about 3 Plato.
    Primary for about 12 days, rising yeast using CO2 bursts from the bottom port at the cone every day during the last 4-5 days.
    Cold crashing, conditioning plus pulling yeast for 4-6 days
    Packaging.
    This is prety much the same protocol for all my beers, no problems at all, only with the wheat.
    What the hell is wrong?



    Sent from my Mi A1 using Tapatalk


  • #2
    It's the WB-06....

    The WB-06 is actually listed as a diastaticus variant by Fermentis. This means it (most likely) contains the STA1 gene. Basically, the yeast will produce glucoamylase, and that enzyme will breakdown dextrins that other variants of Saccharomyces can not. It takes time for the glucoamylase to cleave, and so you will usually see a long stall between the initial maltose/glucose wort and the "second" drop in gravity. Saison Dupont is know for something very similar, albeit with a different flavor profile entirely.

    Personally, I would cut one pack out and pitch 1kg into 20hL myself. I would also not rouse the yeast with co2, and I would KO @ 68*F and free rise to 72*F. But that really shouldn't be how you adjust. If you are looking for all things equal, you could consider a supplemental Amylo-glucosidase addition to help the breakdown of dextrins occur faster.

    Another suggestion would be to simply calculate for the potential increase in co2 production based on the FG estimates. In other words, carbonate to a lower lever and allow some packaged conditioning to get you to the proper carbonation for serving.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by UnFermentable View Post
      It's the WB-06....

      The WB-06 is actually listed as a diastaticus variant by Fermentis. This means it (most likely) contains the STA1 gene. Basically, the yeast will produce glucoamylase, and that enzyme will breakdown dextrins that other variants of Saccharomyces can not. It takes time for the glucoamylase to cleave, and so you will usually see a long stall between the initial maltose/glucose wort and the "second" drop in gravity. Saison Dupont is know for something very similar, albeit with a different flavor profile entirely.

      Personally, I would cut one pack out and pitch 1kg into 20hL myself. I would also not rouse the yeast with co2, and I would KO @ 68*F and free rise to 72*F. But that really shouldn't be how you adjust. If you are looking for all things equal, you could consider a supplemental Amylo-glucosidase addition to help the breakdown of dextrins occur faster.

      Another suggestion would be to simply calculate for the potential increase in co2 production based on the FG estimates. In other words, carbonate to a lower lever and allow some packaged conditioning to get you to the proper carbonation for serving.
      Thanks alot!
      I think I will try another yeast strain...

      Sent from my Mi A1 using Tapatalk

      Comment


      • #4
        I stopped using WB-06 due to this same problem. I have since gone to using a 50/50 blend of T-58 and S-33 at 70% of normal pitching rates with good results for hefe type flavor.
        Tim Eichinger
        Visit our website blackhuskybrewing.com

        Comment


        • #5
          If you are going to select a different product, I would suggest the Munich Classic from Lallemand. I like this strain a lot myself. I cannot promise it is not STA1, but I have never had issues with over attenuation myself.

          I really like the S-33 in some beers as well, but you really need a POF (phenolic off flavor) strain to make a proper hefe or wit, IMHO. T-58 probably qualifies. You are looking for the PAD1 gene to influence ferulic acid conversion to 4-vinyl guaiacol (clove).

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