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Erbsloh Beerzym hopflower & Diacetyl

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  • Erbsloh Beerzym hopflower & Diacetyl

    We recently used this product for one of our seasonals:
    http://www.erbsloeh.com/product_data...er_GB_001_.pdf

    First impression was great. we got a huge boost of hop character from the beerzym. During sensory we determined that the perceived hoppiness was on par with similar core range beer, while copper and dry hopping rates were less than half.

    Now, after about 5 weeks in package the beers with where the product was used are absolute Diacetyl bombs. and I mean RANCID butter.
    We brewed 3 batches of the same beer. Beerzym was used in 2 out of the 3. Both batches with the enzym are now undrinkable and the one without appears to be D-free.

    Also interesting to note that at packaging there was not a trace of off-flavors.

    Does anyone have any experience or understanding of what might be at play here?
    Beer was fermented with 05 and we have never had this problem before.

    Thanks!
    -e

  • #2
    Just found this link. need to take a bit more time to thoroughly study it, but looks like I might be on to something:
    https://www.dovepress.com/the-effect...t-article-IJWR

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    • #3
      That article deals with malolactic fermentations, very different and with different yeast. Here is my guess, based on how the product worked. We recently were approached about it and have decided not to use it based on the potential risks of refermentation.

      The enzyme cleaves a glucose from an aromatic compound, that glucose is going to get used by the yeast. Problem you will have is that you will get additional fermentation because of this. The beer will already be depleted of many nutrients and is colder than normal ferment temps, probably get a ton of diacetyl precursor into the beer. It is probably best to do a forced diacetyl test after your dry hop regiment with the enzyme to verify that it is clean.

      The other possibility is that this is happening in your packaged product. Enzyme activity is based on temperature, too low and activity is slow. If you have some yeast that make it into package, IE:if you don't filter or pasturize, then you could get the same process happening in the keg/bottle/can.

      Solutions, either a second diacetyl rest after dry hop, might fix the problem. Or you have to dose the enzyme and dry hop when enough yeast is still in the tank to clean it up and the tank is warm enough to let the enzyme work quickly.

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      • #4
        Absolutely seconding jebzter. By liberating the glucose from the aromatic terpenes, you’re dosing the beer with sugar after fermentation is completed, when the yeast are dropping out of suspension. There is already some indication that dry hopping adds to fermentable sugars, and by adding more you are absolutely going to add the diacetyl precursor - alpha acetolactate, or AAL - to the mix. To reiterate - you are, by definition, adding one molecule of glucose for every molecule of aromatic glycoside. If you’ve already dropped the yeast, which most people do prior to DH, you’re going to add sugar, produce AAL as a fermentation byproduct by the small amount of suspended yeast, then crash before the AAL can convert to diacetyl and can be metabolized by yeast like in a typical D rest. Thus, making a butter bomb.

        Were I to use such an enzyme, I would at the very least do a forced diacetyl test before crashing to 32, and would probably use the enzyme during active fermentationand before d-rest. Sounds like a good excuse to make one of these DH during fermentation NEIPAs

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        • #5
          Originally posted by theomuller View Post

          Were I to use such an enzyme, I would at the very least do a forced diacetyl test before crashing to 32, and would probably use the enzyme during active fermentationand before d-rest. Sounds like a good excuse to make one of these DH during fermentation NEIPAs
          :') Going to go buy 30,000 pallets of oats immediately

          Thanks for the info guys, seems spot on!

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