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house yeast recommendations

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  • powwowwow
    replied
    it seems to me like 007 Dry English Ale yeast should be a part of this conversation. pretty neutral, good performer, and it drops clear without needing filtration.

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  • gray31
    replied
    Have to agree with White Labs Pacific ale. Used it to make everything from a stout to a cream ale. So far It's shown to be very versital.

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  • jrpragnell
    replied
    WLP041 Pacific Ale Yeast

    Old post but a good one.

    I've just worked at one brewery before, we used an english yeast, origin unknown.

    Brewery coming in bout 2 months, so got to decide which house straing to go with. Im overseas so I have been playing with s-05 mainly on my pilot batches, cuz of all the complication of transport. I am just not completely satisfied, I feel its lacking some life in it.

    Just tried WLP041 in a pilot batch and my mind was blown, i really liked it, has anybody used it in your brewery? Reading homebrew forums they say that it takes a lot to finish. Any comments?

    Tks

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  • Brew Chef
    replied
    Originally posted by RobZamites
    Count my vote for Safale S-04 for the blonde and pale. That stuff ferments fast, clean and flocs out like mad! Not a saleman for them, just a satisfied brewer.

    Rob
    +1 and our house strain

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  • beertje46
    replied
    Originally posted by Gordie
    In the meantime - does anyone know what Matt ended up deciding on and how it worked out for him?

    Gordie
    It appears Matt dropped off the PB map. His last post was: 12-08-2006, 03:39 PM

    It would be interesting to learn what he chose...

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  • Gordie
    replied
    In the meantime - does anyone know what Matt ended up deciding on and how it worked out for him?

    Gordie

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  • beertje46
    replied
    Or you can call it Deja-Brew.

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  • Scott M
    replied
    Originally posted by beertje46
    Why does somebody restart a three year old thread on yeast selection?
    Never looked at the date on the first post that's just funny!!

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  • ibrewforyou
    replied
    memory loss?
    (from copious amounts of ale)

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  • youngbuckbrewer
    replied
    House Yeast

    I would vote for 1968. It is very versatile and aggressive fermenter. We get attentuation levels as high as the mid 80's if we mash lower (High 140's). It also drops extremely bright quickly and with a proper diacetyl rest is key. I also never have a problem getting enough yeast, it is very clumpy and doesn't even make it into the serving tank or kegs at all. We use it as a house yeast with styles ranging from American Wheat to Pale Ales to stouts. Very user friendly strain!

    Michael Uhrich
    Owner/Brewer
    Carter's Brewing
    Billings, MT

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  • Scott M
    replied
    Originally posted by Brew Chef
    Brewpubs can make a nice dime on a system as small as 1 BBL. We pay our brewer $60 to brew (3) 50 Liter kegs of beer.
    Are you getting a deal, or what! Is your brewer also responsible for creating your recipes, purchasing the malts and hops, determining the water adjustments? So, for $60 you have a guy who sets up a brew day, transfers the wort to fermentation, cleans up the brewery, monitors the fermentation and kegs 40 gallons of product? He must be like me, just happy to be brewing!!

    To get back on topic, WLP001 and or 0051 would not be bad choices just because of the versitility..though Wyeast 1968 has been my choice for all my English style Ales.
    Last edited by Scott M; 03-04-2009, 11:33 AM.

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  • ibrewforyou
    replied
    from your list my vote goes to edinburgh....

    of course i would prefer chico/california yeast for a house strain.
    most of the brewpubs in my area use it for house yeast.
    easy, drops out well.

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  • troybinso
    replied
    Wow, $60 a batch is a screaming deal. That's barely even minimum wage.

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  • Brew Chef
    replied
    Originally posted by Larry Horwitz
    2 things to consider....fast floccing yeasts are almost all D leavers (as a rule)...the diacetyl can't be absorbed if the yeast isn't in contact with it. So think about warm rests for reduction.

    also, dish bottom fvs will rat hole....you won't be able to bottom crop and get the yeast you really need. Counting on top cropping can be a pain too.

    I also agree....3.5BBls is a very, very, tough way to make a buck.

    good luck. hope you like homebrewing.
    Brewpubs can make a nice dime on a system as small as 1 BBL. We pay our brewer $60 to brew (3) 50 Liter kegs of beer. The ingredients in our beer per batch average about $60, and energy is about $20. That's about $150 for three kegs of beer that we sell by the pint at $4. We can safely say that we do $1000 in sales with (3) 50 liter kegs so 15% cost is a good margin. An aspiring brewpub owner could also brew the beer him/herself and cut that margin down even further. I know....I did it. Thankfully my brewer is happy with $60 per batch, and he usually brews two batches a day, 4 days per week. He loves what he does...and he does it very well. It's a great way to get started in business. The restaurant sales are also a big addition to the business. The profits are lower but it gets the people into the brewpub and well over half of them have at least two beers.

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  • Brew Chef
    replied
    Fermentis S-04 gets my vote. THis is our house strain for everything except our Hefe and Wit. We are getting great results from it. It's is pretty mild in flavor and makes a great foundation for our recipes.

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