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  • Maple syrup

    So Im doing a small experimental batch of maple porter and thinking of carbonating with the syrup and then bottling. I have read quite a bit about using syrup as a fermentable in the mash or racking the beer on to it for flavour. Does anyone have any experience using syrup, besides the fact that it is expensive and you need a lot to impart a decent flavour? I am mostly interested in its uses post primary fermentation. Thanks...

  • #2
    The maple syrup would be bolied before bottling and I guess I would be counting on some fermentation to add carbonation. Just curious on how much to avoid the bottle bomb yet had subtle sweetness. Im sure it will take a few trys to hit the mark.

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    • #3
      I think you are missing an important point that beerme makes. You cannot add any measurable amount of sugar before packaging without expecting additional fermentation to occur. You must either kill or filter out your yeast.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by andrew_FSBC View Post
        I think you are missing an important point that beerme makes. You cannot add any measurable amount of sugar before packaging without expecting additional fermentation to occur. You must either kill or filter out your yeast.
        He's made it pretty clear that he's expecting bottle fermentation. Standard bottle conditioning. What he's asking is how much syrup can be safely added to achieve carbonation while adding flavour.

        I can't answer the question but the MBAA is hosting a bottle conditioning webinar on January 18. Maybe you can ask the question there?

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        • #5
          beerme sounds likes its your time of the month? First off these would not be sent to stores to be sold, it was only experimental to see if you can kill two birds with one stone, flavour and carbonation. Pretty standard procedure, put sugar in bottle create Co2, do you remember that from chemistry class? I didn't think that such a simple question would would send you off the edge. You are the only person in the industry that I have heard has a problem with new craft breweries and based on some of your previous posts just an all around negative person. Most people are welcoming, willing to help and at the very least civil. Keep your sh*t to your self and this will be a better place for it.

          Thanks for the info mswebb I'll look into that.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mswebb View Post
            He's made it pretty clear that he's expecting bottle fermentation. Standard bottle conditioning. What he's asking is how much syrup can be safely added to achieve carbonation while adding flavour.

            I can't answer the question but the MBAA is hosting a bottle conditioning webinar on January 18. Maybe you can ask the question there?

            Well, no: The maple syrup would be bolied before bottling and I guess I would be counting on some fermentation to add carbonation. Just curious on how much to avoid the bottle bomb yet had subtle sweetness. Im sure it will take a few trys to hit the mark.

            I would call this neither clear nor standard bottle conditioning. The use of the words "some" and "adding subtle sweetness" are vague and leave me to believe he wants to keep some of the residual sugar from the syrup in the bottle.

            As far as my opinion on how much to use: pure Maple Syrup is 11#/gallon and while it's not 100% sugar I would ,as a starting point, assume it is and extrapolate how much to use based on your bottling volume from there. Bottle up a couple samples, get them warm (80°F) for a couple weeks and see what level of carbonation you get from that.

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            • #7
              The sugars in maple syrup are primarly sucrose (i.e., table sugar) and are essentially 100% fermentable. You can use it to prime for bottling as you would with dextrose, adjusting for the water content present in the syrup. You're not going to get any residual sweetness, but might end up with some subtle maple flavours or aroma, which may well produce the sensory impression of increased sweetness.

              When you say it will be boiled, I assume you mean that you're boiling it to sanitize it before using it to prime, right? (I assume you aren't talking about adding it to your boil.)

              Here's a quick article from Brew Your Own that provides a bit more info: https://byo.com/grains/item/1694-map...ates-mr-wizard

              As long as you do your math right, I can't see any reason at all why using syrup to bottle condition would be any more dangerous than any other sugar.
              Last edited by NS_Nano; 01-09-2017, 10:21 PM.

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              • #8
                Thanks NS_Nano,that article was a great help once I wrapped my head around the math.

                Yes boiling was strictly for sanitation and I keep in mind the water content will change as well. I will probably try several different amounts of priming syrup and see what works best for flavour and carbonation. Let you know how it goes, cheers...

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                • #9
                  I've had success using maple sugar as a primer. Imparts a nice maple flavour but also added sweetness so it is something to consider when brewing.

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