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Using spent grain in food recipes?

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  • Using spent grain in food recipes?

    Hey now...

    Trying to come up with some uses for the spent grain (besides livestock grub). I've heard that some places are incorporating it into foods served at the brewpub...

    Any suggestions? (No other brewpubs in my area are doing this, so I wouldn't be horning in on anyone's territory!

    Cheers
    KMafooz

  • #2
    If you serve pizza or breadsticks, you can incorporate some into the dough. This works especially well for whole grain dough.

    I could see it working for a dessert as part of the crust of a cobbler.

    With lots of butter, anything will taste good!

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    • #3
      I also know of a brew pub (here in Germany) which makes a sauerkraut pizza with regular dough + some spent grain mixed in.

      Sounds crazy, but it is truly excellent.

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      • #4
        In Germany it is known as treberbrot - so maybe Google up some info on that. From my experience you can go to 10% of the material bill before you need to address some of the other key ingredients like binders and the core grain flours.

        Wes

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        • #5
          Another direction to go in is dog biscuits. We've made a few batches of spent grain dog biscuits and the dogs seem to LOVE them. We have a battle axe in our logo, so we found a battle axe-shaped cookie cutter and we're considering selling the dog biscuits on the side.
          Mike Hiller, Head Brewer
          Strangeways Brewing
          2277-A Dabney Road
          Richmond, VA 23230
          804-303-4336
          www.strangewaysbrewing.com

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          • #6
            Good call, Wes.

            Here's a link from a hobby brew page for bread made with (recommended) weizen beer Treber:

            http://wiki.hobbybrauer.de/index.php...orn-Treberbrot

            If anyone needs help with translation, let me know.

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            • #7
              Dog biscuits

              We tried doing dog biscuits and it worked great until we checked some packages about a month later and found they had gotten moldy. How did you prepare them so they didn't develop mold?

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              • #8
                I give it to the local Bakeries and they bring me Bread back and sell he ther I serve his bread with the Meals or wth Butter as entees.Everybody is happy especially when we ad brewed our Dark ne.Harry
                Harald Mois

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                • #9
                  Dancing Camel,
                  We baked a couple of test batches and gave a lot of them away. We still have some for our own dog that we keep in a cookie jar and those are about three weeks old. No mold or anything so far.

                  The recipe we found is rather simple: 4 cups spent grain, 4 cups flour, 1 egg and 1 cup of either peanut butter, pizza sauce or cheese. Bake them for 30 minutes at 350 degrees, then reduce heat to 225 degrees and bake for 8 to 10 hours to thoroughly dry them out. The drying prevents the mold. Actually, what we did was bake at 225 for an hour or two, turned off the oven and went to bed leaving the biscuits in the oven over night. Worked fine.
                  Mike Hiller, Head Brewer
                  Strangeways Brewing
                  2277-A Dabney Road
                  Richmond, VA 23230
                  804-303-4336
                  www.strangewaysbrewing.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hey,

                    I have had success substituting dried spent grains into any recipe that calls for bran flour. It imparts a sweet taste as the drying breaks up some long chain starches. It is best done with raisins or something else. Fiberlicious!

                    Patrick Fiori

                    Clocktower Brewpub

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                    • #11
                      I have heard of brewpubs adding some spent grains to pizza dough, but I would've thought that part of what makes barleymalt good for brewing (the husk acting as a natural filter) makes it bad for eating - all that husk getting caught in your throat!?
                      cheers
                      MikeMcG
                      www.betwixt.co.uk

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                      • #12
                        Like bran

                        Baking somewhat softens the husk-- but still fiber rich.
                        Any baked food can use spent grain.
                        Muffins
                        Bagels
                        pretzels
                        bread, savory
                        breads, sweet
                        crackers
                        chips
                        granola
                        pie crusts
                        cookies
                        Makes a very moist dough.

                        If you dry and can screen-- the husks can be used in potting soil

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                        • #13
                          For the drying part of dog biscuit making, couldn't one treat it like jerky. Using air filter for household vents and a box fan? I would imagine my chef would me miffed if I tied up an oven that long =) Maybe incorp. a space heater to force warm air??? Just some backyard engineering thoughts.

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