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Munich vs Aromatic vs Honey malt

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  • #16
    Originally posted by twoodward15
    Sweet = sweet
    malty = malty.

    Sweet doesn't mean it's malty. It's a great misconception that took me a while to understand.
    Compare a good Dunkel (malty, not sweet) with a Milk Stout, or many doppelbocks (malty and sweet). That should get the point across.
    -Lyle C. Brown
    Brewer
    Camelot Brewing Co.

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    • #17
      Melanoidin = sharp?

      Hello Kai! I've homebrewed a beer with 100% Melanoidin malt before and it was not sharp to my taste. Anybody else experience a sharpness? I was trying to get the malty flavors of an Oktoberfest or Doppelbock without decoction. Worked fairly well. Most of the craft Oktoberfests & Doppelbocks I've tasted in the US have come up short on the malt. Now I haven't tasted all of them and probably not any of yours! But just saying that extreme malt has been difficult for me to obtain, and hard for me to find in a craft setting. If someone has this figured out, please let me know how you do it. I promise I'll guard the treasure!
      Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--

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      • #18
        I have not done it myself (no lagers at Battlefield yet), but this year's Fest from Victory was spot on in that department. When I e-mailed them, the response was to thank me for noticing "our efforts to source only the finest malts from Franconia." I presume this was referring to Munich Malt, as I have heard previously that is what they use in the fest (doesn't everyone?). I don't know what brand they are using, but would guess it is either a small maltster that they contacted in person, or possibly Weyermann.
        -Lyle C. Brown
        Brewer
        Camelot Brewing Co.

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        • #19
          Aromatic Malt (Dingemans)

          Aromatic Malt (Dingemans): I've been using it in many of my beers, ranging from American Brown Ales to Belgian Pale ale, using it in proportions of 7-10% with other specialty malts. So, I've been tempted by using a large proportion of Aromatic. My latest test features 60% Pilsner, 38% Aromatic and 3% Dark Candi Syrup. Turned out to be very malty and dry in taste (reminds me of Caraaroma) although it finished at 5,3% a/v with a residual of 3°P. The taste is biscuity and husky, almost kinda cardboard. The aroma is not so "aromatic" but mingles nicely with the candy, delivering some warm molassy notes.

          I've now went back to 18% with a bit of light crystals for balance and I conclude it's close to perfect, having it as a foundation rather than being showcased upfront.

          Ben

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