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Munich vs Aromatic vs Honey malt

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  • Zucker Bee
    replied
    Aromatic Malt (Dingemans)

    Aromatic Malt (Dingemans): I've been using it in many of my beers, ranging from American Brown Ales to Belgian Pale ale, using it in proportions of 7-10% with other specialty malts. So, I've been tempted by using a large proportion of Aromatic. My latest test features 60% Pilsner, 38% Aromatic and 3% Dark Candi Syrup. Turned out to be very malty and dry in taste (reminds me of Caraaroma) although it finished at 5,3% a/v with a residual of 3°P. The taste is biscuity and husky, almost kinda cardboard. The aroma is not so "aromatic" but mingles nicely with the candy, delivering some warm molassy notes.

    I've now went back to 18% with a bit of light crystals for balance and I conclude it's close to perfect, having it as a foundation rather than being showcased upfront.

    Ben

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  • beerking1
    replied
    I have not done it myself (no lagers at Battlefield yet), but this year's Fest from Victory was spot on in that department. When I e-mailed them, the response was to thank me for noticing "our efforts to source only the finest malts from Franconia." I presume this was referring to Munich Malt, as I have heard previously that is what they use in the fest (doesn't everyone?). I don't know what brand they are using, but would guess it is either a small maltster that they contacted in person, or possibly Weyermann.

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  • gitchegumee
    replied
    Melanoidin = sharp?

    Hello Kai! I've homebrewed a beer with 100% Melanoidin malt before and it was not sharp to my taste. Anybody else experience a sharpness? I was trying to get the malty flavors of an Oktoberfest or Doppelbock without decoction. Worked fairly well. Most of the craft Oktoberfests & Doppelbocks I've tasted in the US have come up short on the malt. Now I haven't tasted all of them and probably not any of yours! But just saying that extreme malt has been difficult for me to obtain, and hard for me to find in a craft setting. If someone has this figured out, please let me know how you do it. I promise I'll guard the treasure!

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  • beerking1
    replied
    Originally posted by twoodward15
    Sweet = sweet
    malty = malty.

    Sweet doesn't mean it's malty. It's a great misconception that took me a while to understand.
    Compare a good Dunkel (malty, not sweet) with a Milk Stout, or many doppelbocks (malty and sweet). That should get the point across.

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  • twoodward15
    replied
    Sweet = sweet
    malty = malty.

    Sweet doesn't mean it's malty. It's a great misconception that took me a while to understand. I love sweet malty beers, but some people love malty beers (that aren't sweet). If sweet is what you are looking for then that is the way to go, but if malt flavor is what you are looking for then it doesn't necessarily have to be sweet to get that flavor profile. I'll second using Maris Otter and some 60L and munich. maybe bump up the base malt a bit to get more malt flavor and increase the sweetness a tad.

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  • jjs
    replied
    Never considered that about the boil. That's exactly what I do with my wee heavy. Runn off a small portion and boil the hell out of it. sweet = malt. Daaa
    Don't I feel like the F A H. Thanks for all the input.

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  • beerking1
    replied
    A longer boil should give you more malliard reactions, which will indeed increase sweet, malty character. You could pull a portion of the wort (~20%) and boil it like crazy for about 90 minutes, which would create a LOT of malliard products. It will provide a sweet toffee-like character to the beer, and is sometimes what is done for Scotch Wee Heavy.

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  • Capt. Bob
    replied
    How about something simple....
    Like a longer boil. Extra 1/2 hour or two.

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  • wiredgourmet
    replied
    Originally posted by jarviw
    Think high mashing temp as to increase body (mouth feel), not maltiness (flavor).
    Seconded. I think there's a tendency to associate dextrins with maltiness because more dextrins are often present in high-kilned and caramel malts, which of course have a more malty flavour. But the flavour is more a function of kilning/roasting, not dextrins per se.

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  • jarviw
    replied
    Originally posted by jjs
    It's interesting that high mash temps are mentioned as not a good way to increase malt character. I suppose I am confusing dextrin sweetness with malty flavor. I always felt high mash temp = more malt flavor. This is apparently not true. What are your thoughts on that?
    Think high mashing temp as to increase body (mouth feel), not maltiness (flavor).

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  • kai
    replied
    My way of thinking is taste a bag of fieldose / maltodextrin. That's usually corn or wheat derived dextrin and it doesn't taste like anything much, so I don't see that dextrins from malted barley would be very different.

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  • jjs
    replied
    My Oktoberfest is 25 % Vienna and 25 % Munich. Malty as hell. It's interesting that high mash temps are mentioned as not a good way to increase malt character. I suppose I am confusing dextrin sweetness with malty flavor. I always felt high mash temp = more malt flavor. This is apparently not true. What are your thoughts on that? I use 1056 but will be changibg to WL002 soon. Good choice I thinj to alter malt flavor. Thanks for all the input.

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  • LuskusDelph
    replied
    Munich, definitely.
    If you want additional sweetness, you can use honey malt, but for a deep and rich malt character without excessive sweetness the Munich will probably give you exactly what you're after.
    I often use it at 20% for exactly that purpose.

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  • kai
    replied
    Melanoidin can get a little sharp as well as being toasty if you use too much. It's a malt that needs to be used sparingly but can have very good effect.

    For an amber my choice (also having never used aromatic or honey malt as till now they haven't been readily available down under) would definitely be munich (weyermann munich I) at around 10% for starters. It's nice and soft with some lovely bread crust flavours.

    Oh and I don't believe mashing high does anything to increase maltiness. It increases body, not malt character. Same goes for carapils.

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  • BigWilley
    replied
    I use a lot of Gambrinus Honey malt, it gives a nice malty sweetness that is more munich like than crystal malts. Melanoidan is like a super munich and is good in small amounts but can get quite bready and biscuity if you use too much. For an Amber you could blend them all. Caramunich might be nice as well. Depends what kind of malt flavor you want? Toasty and bready, concentrate on munich, melanoidan and honey malt. Caramel sweetness go for some crystal malts or caramunichs in the 40-70L range. Yeast has a big impact as well. I use WLP001 and while it is nice and clean it does seem to be hop focused and it really attenuates out. I like a fruitier or breadier yeast for an Amber.

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