Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Honey in the beer

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    How do you add the honey post ferment? Does'nt it just drop to the bottom? This is a brown beer so I don't want a lot of honey flavor. Just enough to know it's there. Thanks

    Comment


    • #17
      pasteurize at 180 for 20 minutes diluted in some water. Chill or not. Add to server prior to transfer for good mixing. If you need to add it to a full tank simply push it into the tank with CO2 from a keg and use a carb stone to mix.
      Big Willey
      "You are what you is." FZ

      Comment


      • #18
        crystalized honey

        update to how I added honey post-ferment. Used the Crystalized Honey from our food vendor. when trasfering the beer into another fermenter I pulled beer and mixed it into a sanitiezed bucket then tossed it in. After mixing teaspoon with I pint pulled from the sample port, I decided it would be a litle stron so went with 1/2 tsp. per pint. doing the math was roughly 28 oz for 6.5 bbls. I went with 24 (size of container) So far so good.
        "Uncle" Frank
        Frank Fermino
        Brewer I, Redhook, Portsmouth, NH
        Writer, Yankee Brew News, New England
        Wise-ass, Everywhere, Always

        Comment


        • #19
          I use that much on 10 gallons of a light cream ale. It'll ferment out leaving behind a nice flavor/aroma. Can't imagine it had any effect on 6+ bbls. Also, your math doesn't add up. At 1/2 tsp per pint, and 6.5 bbls ( I rounded a bit as well) you'd need about 18 cups. The problem you had I believe is that you did the math using weights and used the same weight as water. Basically you needed a bit over a gallon of honey to do what you wanted to do.

          Comment


          • #20
            Having made meads for many years from raw honeys and no boiling, I've never had any infection problems as long as your sani procedures are up to snuff.
            If you have the chance to make a small homebrew batch of mead with your local honey, you can gauge better the resulting flavors that would carry over to a beer recipe.
            There are many sources of honey out there and some make dreadful fermented beverages, so just because the honey is sweet and good tasting raw, doesn't always mean it will work well through a ferment.
            I add my honey right after boil during whirlpool, it helps mix well and not settle on the bottom of the kettle.
            Honey Beers Are Great!

            Comment


            • #21
              1lb per bbl post ferment. Best way to do it is to slowly add in line, warmed up helps, to make sure the most can get dissolved into the beer. If you don't have this as an option, you can open up your bright tank and add it in as you transfer in. Not quite as effective but it will work. The honey won't completely dissolve though so your first few pints, pitchers, kegs will be pretty strong in the honey department.

              As for the Botulism concern, I'm pretty certain it won't grow in beer especially if you keep it cold and someone drinks it within a month. The spores can survive in the honey, which is where the risk comes from but it doesn't form a risk for anyone except infants.

              Comment


              • #22
                Hey meadman are there a few general rules of thumb for a honey type that ferments well? Is "wildflower" or "multi flower" honey a good choice?
                thx!

                Comment


                • #23
                  I, too have been brewing meads for many years. Wildflower honey should be fine. In fact, that or good quality clover honey is probably best for your use. Cost effective, and you are unlikely to pick up any difference if you were to use a monofloral variety.
                  Main thing is to avoid strong flavored honeys. Buckwheat, eucalyptus and the like are generally not good in most beverages (although a good meadmaker can come up with a spice or fruit blend that will balance the stronger flavors of such meads and use them).
                  -Lyle C. Brown
                  Brewer
                  Camelot Brewing Co.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Thx Beerking1. I have 24# of "wildflower" honey heading our way. I almost went clover but it is from clover fields in the Dakotas and the wildflower is harvested just south of us in the farm fields. Trying to minimize our carbon footprint and all. It was not as easy as I thought it would be to find bulk honey in Idaho.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Beerking1 is correct. The strong, more pungent honeys typically don't make very good straight meads. The more info you can get from you beekeeper as to what wildflowers his hives have been on the most will help you decide.
                      Here in Montana we have been invaded by Spotted Knapweed. It makes a nice strong honey for your toast, but in a mead it leaves metallic, harsh flavors.
                      Your wildflower honey you have coming should be fine, but if you can spare about 2# I would suggest making a gallon of mead using your house yeast and see what kind of flavors you get from the ferment.
                      Cheers!

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Also worth noting: Stay away from Chinese honey!! They often add adjuncts like corn syrup to lower cost.

                        Your best bet is to know your beekeeper. Some commercial bees are moved near a landfill during months when there are not many flowers in bloom. The result is the bees gather sweet "nectar" from things like mostly empty soda cans, giving you "trash honey." I doubt you really want your beer to have a "trashy" flavor!
                        -Lyle C. Brown
                        Brewer
                        Camelot Brewing Co.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X