Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tap Faucet quality - how much does it matter?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • gitchegumee
    replied
    I've used Shur-Flo Beer Ace as well as FloJet. The latter are easier to install in multiple sets. They sell panels pre-assembled for up to four pumps. Looked around, but can't find any pictures of installations I've done--too bad as there were two projects where I had panels of 24 pumps. 8 for each of 3 floors of dispense. Very cool switchup panel that used PU push fittings to switch tanks to pumps. We had long dispense lines for each of these installs and had no real choice but to use pumps. Used to like walking into the cold room on a very busy night to switch BBT for a product and listen to the many pumps chugging away. Very steam punk in a cold room sort of way.

    Anyway, the same pump is used to clean and dispense. No tools, no mess. Less than 1 minute to unclamp a tail from BBT and then drop into a bucket of cleaner. Walk to faucet and open to clean. Done. Your setup will likely work well for you, but the disadvantage is that you cannot change your backpressure from keg to faucet. Once you install the line, the associated line losses are set in stone. Your regulator must be set to desired carbonation pressure, so that can't be changed to make up for any flow issues. So, I see four ways to address this: 1) Set it and forget it. Standard 6' of 3/16" line to faucet for most average pours. This is typical bar setup for 2.65 volume beers at 38F. 2) Set each line for a set carbonation level. Longer lines for more carbonation, shorter for less. 3) Set the lines a bit short and use the restrictor taps to introduce the bit of resistance for each line's optimal pour. 4) Beer pumps. Which IMO is the cat's meow. There is a 5th, but I'll have to draw it rather than explain. It involves the switchup panel I discussed above. Hope this helps clarify.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jay Newbie
    replied
    Originally posted by gitchegumee View Post
    And you've made my point for me! Your proposed solution is a March pump. Plus fittings. Plus the dedicated GFCI circuit inside a cold room. Plus the effort of filling a keg with tap cleaner, then rinse, and then sanitizer (assuming you have a multi-step tap cleaning procedure). Compare that to an installed beer pump: take the tail off of the keg (or BBT), drop into a bucket of cleaner, open the tap. Done. Beer pumps pull the liquid cleaner through the lines. You can clean as many lines simultaneously as you want. With zero decrease in line flow: your March pump flow won't be divided among four lines. Each line gets full flow. And you can turn up the beer pump pressure if you like to get even more flow. You'll save so much time with a recurring task. And be more inclined to actually clean the lines when you're supposed to because it's not that big of a deal. That's a big part of operating a brewery; efficiency of your time, tool-less operation, simple/easy/effective SOPs for those things you do all the time. Plus you get the added bonus of regulating your dispense pressure in a much more effective way than an adjustable flow tap faucet. I'm all about working smarter, not harder. For me--beer pumps are a no-brainer. I invite others who disagree to make their point as well.
    I think we're on the same page besides using a pump to move the beer. I already setup my coldroom with multiple dedicated outlets so that's not an issue. The run is only 8 foot for the furthest keg. If I put a reg on each line I don't see any problems pouring or the need for a pump to move the beer.
    I was thinking of a manifold on the March pump (or whatever pump I need to move the cleaner) to clean multiple lines at once. Filling a keg or bucket with cleaning solution to flush them with. Lines will be cleaned weekly.

    What pump do you use as a beer pump? You use this same pump to force beer through the lines as well as cleaning the lines correct? Which would mean you're always setup to clean? Do you have a pic of your pump and lines?

    Leave a comment:


  • gitchegumee
    replied
    And you've made my point for me! Your proposed solution is a March pump. Plus fittings. Plus the dedicated GFCI circuit inside a cold room. Plus the effort of filling a keg with tap cleaner, then rinse, and then sanitizer (assuming you have a multi-step tap cleaning procedure). Compare that to an installed beer pump: take the tail off of the keg (or BBT), drop into a bucket of cleaner, open the tap. Done. Beer pumps pull the liquid cleaner through the lines. You can clean as many lines simultaneously as you want. With zero decrease in line flow: your March pump flow won't be divided among four lines. Each line gets full flow. And you can turn up the beer pump pressure if you like to get even more flow. You'll save so much time with a recurring task. And be more inclined to actually clean the lines when you're supposed to because it's not that big of a deal. That's a big part of operating a brewery; efficiency of your time, tool-less operation, simple/easy/effective SOPs for those things you do all the time. Plus you get the added bonus of regulating your dispense pressure in a much more effective way than an adjustable flow tap faucet. I'm all about working smarter, not harder. For me--beer pumps are a no-brainer. I invite others who disagree to make their point as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jay Newbie
    replied
    Originally posted by gitchegumee View Post
    How will you clean your lines otherwise?
    I was going to fill a couple kegs and use them to flush the lines. Planned on using a March pump for cleaning the lines. Hookup 4 or so at a time.
    My kegs are right behind my tap wall. Very short run. After not finding anyone that used and loved the adjustable taps I'm going to go with a separate reg on each tap line.
    Which reminds me I need to look up info on setting up a Nitro tap. I want a Nitro tap or two as well

    Leave a comment:


  • gitchegumee
    replied
    That would work. I never had good luck with adjustable faucets. Seems like an afterthought or bandage for a tap system that wasn't thought out well. I'd still opt for the separate regulators on each keg for carbonation control and then use beer pumps to get the flow required for perfect flows. Just love how easy it is to clean beer lines, adjust for pouring, and generally have more control over tap line dispense. I'm stuck on beer pumps. Just a bit more effort to install, but a lifetime of easy pour control and fast, efficient tap line cleaning. How will you clean your lines otherwise?

    Leave a comment:


  • Jay Newbie
    replied
    Originally posted by gitchegumee View Post
    As for "carb beers differently", does that mean that one day your tap pours a 2.65 volume beer and the next a 1.90 volume beer? That might be a bit more problematic. I like KISS and keep all beers about same carbonation level. And use beer pumps to smooth out any small differences. Beer pumps are an excellent way to get different carbonation levels poured, but I love them even more for cleaning beer lines. Very easy to drop a beer tail into a bucket and open the tap to clean your lines. No extra equipment or tools required. Best of luck!
    yes. I like my IPAs to have more carbonation that my brown Ale. I'm thinking I'll put a regulator on each keg line to control the pressure going in while adjust the taps for the outflow.



    Leave a comment:


  • gitchegumee
    replied
    "Does anyone use them?" Well of course there's a market for them! I don't like them, but some folks do. I'm in favor of a line designed to pour beer correctly and not using a "tweaker" on the end to try to adjust the flow/back pressure. Others like to fiddle with these adjustable taps to get the pour they want by trial and error rather than (or perhaps in addition to) proper design. I'm fairly certain that my approach wastes less beer over the long run. As for "carb beers differently", does that mean that one day your tap pours a 2.65 volume beer and the next a 1.90 volume beer? That might be a bit more problematic. I like KISS and keep all beers about same carbonation level. And use beer pumps to smooth out any small differences. Beer pumps are an excellent way to get different carbonation levels poured, but I love them even more for cleaning beer lines. Very easy to drop a beer tail into a bucket and open the tap to clean your lines. No extra equipment or tools required. Best of luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jay Newbie
    replied
    How about the adjustable faucets? Does anyone use them?
    I like to carb beers differently. Mostly higher than the norm. Looks like a good way to keep higher co2 in the keg without it shooting out of the tap.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jay Newbie
    replied
    Thx guys
    my coldroom is the back of this solid cinderblock concrete filled wall that the draft lines are coming through. I put a rectangle slot in the wall and insulated it like a box. The long shank is for easy of line removal.

    Leave a comment:


  • TGTimm
    replied
    Originally posted by Jay Newbie View Post

    Thx
    Intertap and Micro matic were also on my list. I do like the screw in nozzle for growler fills and stouts. And they are 10 buck cheaper per.

    Dam, now I see the 12" shank I need to get through the wall cost more that the taps. cha ching mo money mo money lol
    As above, use a shadowbox or live to regret it. With the shanks inside the wall, your first few pours any time the taps haven't been used for a half-hour will be foam until the shank--a pretty hefty hunk of metal--and faucet have cooled down. I like to see the faucets sweating on a warm day.

    As for the SS facets, go for it. As mentioned above, if possible get every thing that touches beer in stainless. Chrome doesn't last at all in a draught system. It seems to me that the hardest thing to source in SS is the shank.
    Last edited by TGTimm; 04-29-2020, 10:27 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • roc-craven
    replied
    Originally posted by Jay Newbie View Post

    Thx
    Intertap and Micro matic were also on my list. I do like the screw in nozzle for growler fills and stouts. And they are 10 buck cheaper per.

    Dam, now I see the 12" shank I need to get through the wall cost more that the taps. cha ching mo money mo money lol
    Use a shadow box in the wall. This will go two things. Shorten your shank length and help keep the faucet cool longer.

    Sent from my SM-G975U1 using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • lhall
    replied
    If you do a taste test on a hoppy beer, you'll never mess with anything but stainless again. Try an old faucet with some brass exposed, and the same beer through a stainless faucet. It's amazing how much it changes the flavor, for the worse.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jay Newbie
    replied
    Originally posted by roc-craven View Post
    Do yourself a favor and buy the intertap SS faucets. They are far superior to the perlicks, and less expensive. They have lots of options.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
    Thx
    Intertap and Micro matic were also on my list. I do like the screw in nozzle for growler fills and stouts. And they are 10 buck cheaper per.

    Dam, now I see the 12" shank I need to get through the wall cost more that the taps. cha ching mo money mo money lol

    Leave a comment:


  • beerme
    replied
    make all components that touch beer stainless, including beer nut nipples and couplers (at least probes). Do it right the first time.

    Take an old plated component and put it in a jar with peracetic acid, and watch it corrode. you don't want that touching your beer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Larry Horwitz
    replied
    any stainless steel faucet is better than any chrome coated brass faucet. The chrome eventually wears off....into beer!!

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X