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  • Tap line question

    I find myself needing to replace the collars that connect to the taps (they aren't damaged yet, but the few that we can't loosen with the wrench (the holes are stripping out) will be once we put the pliers to them.. The tap system goes through the wall into the cold room behind. Obviously we have to pull the shanks to get at the collars. Being geniuses during buildout, we bent the tubes 90 degrees on the back side since they are too long. So to uninstall we will have to unbend them, pull them out from the front, and slide the collars off.

    The question is, once unbent, I'd need to cut them shorter past then unbent bends, BUT then the barbs on the tubes would be gone and when I connect the beer line, I'm not sure they will hold pressure. Thoughts on if this would work?

    Last edited by Twofox; 12-09-2020, 10:21 PM.

  • #2
    First, stop over-tightening your tap faucets. You certainly shouldn’t need to be wearing out your holes on the collars.

    Buy new shanks that don’t have attached tangs.

    You should be able to just get a 90* tang from Foxx Equipment that can be attached via beer-nut and washer. Then you can remove them whenever you want. Or turn them, etc. Or you can get a straight tang.

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    • #3
      I agree with UnFermentable - if you can at all swing it, buy new shanks/tailpieces/collars. Using a faucet wrench that fits into the holes on the shank collar is the proper way to tighten/loosen the collars. Pliers should rarely, if ever, come into play when working with a draft system. An adjustable wrench or box-end wrench of the proper size is a better choice for beer nuts, especially if they are chrome plated vs stainless. If pliers are a must, rubber-dip the business end or at least wrap them with a bar towel, otherwise the hardened steel will wreak havoc on stainless or chrome plated fittings.

      If you are still getting leaks @ the faucet/shank connection make sure the gasket that sits inside the splines on the back of the faucet is in good shape. Over-tightening can permanently compress and indent these gaskets cuasing them to make a poor connection. This is one of our most often-replaced gaskets in our system, as the taptenders like to go heavy-handed on the faucet wrench.

      Lastly, bending stainless tubing/shanks/tailpieces/anything is usually a recipe for kinks and splits unless you are properly set up to do it with a properly supported workpiece.

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      • #4
        OK guys, not really what I was asking about, it's been in place for 4 years. Thanks for trying tho.
        Last edited by Twofox; 12-09-2020, 10:21 PM.

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        • #5
          Oh yea then just dremel off the bent part and wrap it with some electrical tape before attaching a worm clamp.

          That should put you in line with the type of fix you wanted to hear.

          Good luck.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by UnFermentable View Post
            Oh yea then just dremel off the bent part and wrap it with some electrical tape before attaching a worm clamp.

            That should put you in line with the type of fix you wanted to hear.

            Good luck.
            Hahaha good one. /rolleyes

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