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Thread: Trench Drain Materials

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Stanwood,Wa. Snohomish
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by DrainWhisperer View Post
    Poured concrete drains are good, especially when you need to control depth. Since it's essentially a frame (stainless in this case, I assume?) embedded into the concrete, it holds tight and for a long time. And, since it's made from concrete it will expand/contract at the same rate as the rest of the floor. You won't get the buckling people see with plastic systems like Dura Slope.
    Depending on how you do it, though, you're not getting the same chemical tolerance as polymer concrete modular systems (ABT, Polycast). Polymer concrete drains have a resin mixed in to boost chemical resistance, and you don't get that with a former system. Unless you special mix the cement, that is.
    Thanks for the info Hannah. Is there a sealer or coating that would enhance the chemical resistance. I assume you need to seal them regardless. Thanks

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Panama City Florida
    Posts
    414
    I am looking pretty hard at this:
    http://www.trenchdrain.net/food_processing.html

    Looks like some pretty good stuff and they seem to understand what we need.
    Mike Eme
    Brewmaster

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    158

    Any issues with these drains? Breweries are listed as one of the uses.


  4. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Strongsville, Ohio
    Posts
    287
    My guess is that they are not rated for anything above 180f and more than like have NO slope/grade built into them.

    We have 40 ft of something similar and they are a nightmare...... almost useless for anything thicker than water.
    Last edited by Sauce; 07-27-2015 at 06:06 PM.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Fremont, OH USA
    Posts
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Whitewall View Post
    Thanks for the info Hannah. Is there a sealer or coating that would enhance the chemical resistance. I assume you need to seal them regardless. Thanks
    At that point you should just use what you're coating the rest of the floor with. I hear a lot about urethane floor coating, so that could be the place to start. This page has a pretty good explanation of urethane vs polyurethane: http://primecoat.com/faqs-urethane-f...-floor-finish/
    Trench Drain Systems
    sales@trenchdrainsystems.com
    TrenchDrainSystems.com
    610-638-1221

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Fremont, OH USA
    Posts
    3
    It looks a fairly solid construction, but the description doesn't offer many technical details. You want to ask yourself a few questions before buying:
    • Is it pre-sloped? With a 40' run, you should have some slope to the system
    • Do the grates have enough open area? Is there a data sheet on GPM flow?
    • Does it come with a strainer, or will you have to fab one?
    • How deep is the drain? Will it interrupt any existing plumbing?
    Trench Drain Systems
    sales@trenchdrainsystems.com
    TrenchDrainSystems.com
    610-638-1221

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by JDN View Post
    Where are you seeing stainless trenches for $120 per foot? Zurn has their stainless at $359!

    Anybody used Fiber Reinforced Polymer/Vinylester trenches?

    http://www.zurn.com/Pages/ProductDet...NodeKey=390370

    Appears to have good chemical and temp resistance and with the right grates is rated for forklift traffic. I had never heard of it before, so looking for any experiences good or bad. Comes in around $159 per foot with acid resistant forklift rated ductile grates.
    For what it's worth (may be too late for you?) - I just found this V-bottom drain from stainlessdrains.com that is comparable to the Zurn Z890 profile, but is actually thicker 14 gauge 304 stainless (vs. 16 gauge for the Zurn) with a 10 gauge grate for only $158 per foot, grate included. Built to size you need, I'm ordering a couple (10' and 8') for the two drains in the small brewery we are building in San Francisco.

    http://www.stainlessdrains.com/v-bot...nch-drain.html

    Kevin

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Panama City Florida
    Posts
    414
    Quote Originally Posted by JDN View Post
    Where are you seeing stainless trenches for $120 per foot? Zurn has their stainless at $359!

    Anybody used Fiber Reinforced Polymer/Vinylester trenches?

    http://www.zurn.com/Pages/ProductDet...NodeKey=390370

    Appears to have good chemical and temp resistance and with the right grates is rated for forklift traffic. I had never heard of it before, so looking for any experiences good or bad. Comes in around $159 per foot with acid resistant forklift rated ductile grates.
    I just had 85' of those installed. New to us but the BIG downstate breweries use them and seemed to like them. So far so good they drain quickly and all is well
    Mike Eme
    Brewmaster

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    MANITOBA
    Posts
    6

    Handles high temperature, no break-down, forklift friendly, TRY THIS

    Fiberglass doesn't handle temperature over 140 degrees. If you don't want your drain break down when hot liquid washed down, you may go with stainless steel.

    Try this:

    Name:  Pririe Pride Brewing Finished Floor 02.JPG
Views: 597
Size:  52.8 KB

    http://www.slotdrainsystems.com/breweries/
    Slot Drain® is a one-piece, built-in sloped, open floor drain/surface drain system

    info@slotdrainsystems.com
    https://www.slotdrainsystems.com/breweries
    (855) 497-7508

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    NY, NY, USA
    Posts
    1

    Trench Drains

    In regards to trench drains for breweries. A few considerations.

    1) Material- stainless steel grates with an hdpe pre sloped channel are suitable for most applications
    2) Weight load for forklifts
    3) Material should be suitable for caustic chemicals and high heat

    The swiftdrain 600 is a good option. 6" wide, hdpe channel with stainless steel grates. The materials are non reactive to high heat tempratures and they are inert to caustic chemicals.

    Pre sloped from 4" - 28" including catch basin.

    https://swiftdrain.com/product/swiftdrain-600/

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Palau
    Posts
    2,079

    Wth?

    Why would anyone pour 180F waste down the drain? This is not only wasted energy, but also very hard on floors & trenches as some of you have found out. I've never had a problem with ACO drains, but I don't dump needlessly hot waste. If I have a hot kettle, I'll rinse what hops I can't shovel and then use that residual heat for CIP. Think that instead of getting drains to stand up to boiling water, better to shift focus to how you do business. Don't waste heat!
    Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--

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