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Thread: Moving Co2 around the brewery

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Redwood Valley, CA. USA
    Posts
    14
    Boo TGTimm beat me to it. haha.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Carbondale
    Posts
    46
    I just use Tri clap fitting for my Co2 lines. We have a 550lb co2 tank and have a few regulators that run a gas line to each fermenter and bright.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Posts
    366
    Question for those using PEX-AL-PEX. Do you have these lines covered/insulated in some way? After exposure to UV light (even from ambient light) PEX begins to degrade. The standard house rated stuff isn't supposed to be exposed to light for more than 30 days from what I have read. I am considering running CO2/Air headers with it but once I pay to insulate it, I'm almost at the same price as copper....
    Scott LaFollette
    Fifty West Brewing Company
    Cincinnati, Ohio

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Enterprise, Oregon
    Posts
    1,929
    I've had some serious problems with UV degradation using PE (white polyethylene) lines, but we have PEX lines that have been in use in the brewery for a couple of years now with no problems. Of course, all these lines are inside, so not getting direct sunlight. Glass is a fair UV barrier, especially high-E glass, so there's considerably less UV coming through a window than there is outside.

    With PEX-AL-PEX, (Maxline) only the outside layer is exposed at all, as the aluminum layer is opaque.

    If I were doing it again, I'd definitely go with the E-bay QDs mentioned above. I recently replaced all our QDs with (supposedly) SS single-cut-off (the female end has a cut-off) fittings from Foster. Turned out, the locking balls are not SS and I had to replace them all with 440C SS balls from McMaster--not too expensive, but a RPITA. I hadn't been able to find double-cut-off fittings in SS, and really wish we had them--the check valves on our Zahm stone fittings don't always completely seal. Too bad I just spent ~$300 replacing all our QDs!
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Posts
    366
    Circling back to this discussion regarding PEX-AL-PEX lines. I have been pricing stuff out and although the tube is cheaper than using copper the fittings definitely are not! I have several drops and it ends up being more expensive than copper for my application.

    Something occurred to me though. I currently run a 3/8" braided PVC tube from the main CO2 tank to a regulator that runs a serving tank in my cooler. Been that way for 3 years with no problem. I used oetiker clamps to attach to barb fittings. This same tubing is available in 3/4" for pretty cheap. It's rated to 150 psi working/450 psi burst pressure. Why can't I just run my new CO2 and air lines with this? There has to be some simple reason that I am missing...can anybody point it out?

    http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/ite...7920&catid=993
    Scott LaFollette
    Fifty West Brewing Company
    Cincinnati, Ohio

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Enterprise, Oregon
    Posts
    1,929
    Other than the possibility (remote?) of O2 infiltration into the CO2 lines, I can't think of any downside.

    The one thing to always avoid for any pressurized gas lines is rigid PVC--sch 40 or 80. When this stuff bursts, it produces really nasty shrapnel. And it will eventually burst.
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Bainbridge Island, WA
    Posts
    747
    FWIW we have just been using 3/8" braided vinyl, splitting off to strategically placed drops with regulators. Been nearly 4 years, no problems, easy to change or repair. Put some shutoffs here and there in strategic places so if you need to work on a regulator or something you don't have to shut down the entire system.
    Russell Everett
    Co-Founder / Head Brewer
    Bainbridge Island Brewing
    Bainbridge Island, WA

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Northern CA
    Posts
    383
    The only problem I've had with Vinyl tubing for CO2 was somewhere I worked they had the Vinyl run right up to the CO2 dewers. I discovered that if you're pulling a lot of CO2 and things start to freeze up the vinyl can get brittle and start to leak pretty quickly. Never had a problem further along the system.
    Manuel

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