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Thread: Brewing a Gose

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Frederick, MD
    Posts
    3

    Brewing a Gose

    I have been researching and beginning to formulate a recipe for a Gose and have a couple of questions:

    1] During the kettle souring process, I have read that it is recommended to blanket the wort in CO2 to prevent infection from unwanted bugs. My kettle seals up tight except for the stack. Should I blanket the wort with CO2 and shut it off or let the CO2 slowly and continuously run into the kettle? I can accomplish this a couple of ways while keeping the kettle closed up; Add CO2 through the condensate port or bubble it up through the wort from the kettle drain. Which would be best or any other recommendations?

    2] Wyeast carries two different Lacto strains: L. Brevis & L. Buchneri. Which is best for a Gose or does it not matter?

    Thanks,

    -Scott

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Chapin, SC, US
    Posts
    16

    Brewing a Gose

    Hi Scott
    Sent you a PM.
    Cheers!
    Angry Fish Brewing Co
    Lake Murray SC
    We Drink All We Can and Sell the Rest

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    375
    I am by no means an expert at this, but I see no advantage to continuously running the co2. You are less likely to introduce oxygen by having less turbulence IMHO. Save the gas.

    What I did on our Berliner Weisse was to purge co2 on top of the wort by means of the CIP arm via tri-clamp. I actually sealed the kettle tight first, seeing as any pressure could move up the stack or out the condensate. Some would favor the bubbling through the wort, but personally I don't think this is necessary. I low-temp pasteurized after collection in the kettle and then blanketed, then pitched. Co2 is heavy so it will sit on top of the wort just fine. We used the new Lallemand sour brew (L. plantarum) which worked great. I probably should have stopped it around 36 hrs (for this brew), but went 48 and got down to a 3.3 pH. No funky smells or tastes. Very clean lacto flavors. No butyric, or acetic at all. No DMS and no Diacetyl despite a no-boil approach. Would certainly use it again.

    L. plantarum specifies a lower temperature for incubation than the L. brevis, L. delbruckii, or even the L. buchneri I believe, so watch your temp accordingly. Some strains can be homo or hetero fermentative, and thereby potentially produce some alcohol. This may effect how long it takes to get to your desired pH.

    The salt balance is the hardest part if you ask me. It'll make or break the beer. Good Luck!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Big Time, MD
    Posts
    18
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Big Time, MD
    Posts
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    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Frederick, MD
    Posts
    3
    Thanks for the comments & suggestions. I'll let y'all know how it turns out when I brew it.

    -Scott

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Hyde Park, NY
    Posts
    425
    Brewing a gose soon. I feel comfortable with my kettle souring process but I am looking for advice on the amount of salt and coriander to add. Brew size is 7 bbl.
    Hutch Kugeman
    Head Brewer
    Brooklyn Brewery at the Culinary Institute of America
    Hyde Park, NY

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    917
    I use about an ounce per bbl. I was not looking for a salt forward Gose. I think this is roughly half what many other craft examples on the shelf use. I like Westbrook's a lot, but after the second I need a salt break. Cheers. Joel
    Joel Halbleib
    COO / Zymurgist
    Goodwood Brewing Co
    636 East Main St
    Louisville, KY
    goodwood.beer

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