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Thread: Two glycol/jacketed FV questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Wisconsin
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    70

    Two glycol/jacketed FV questions

    ... one practical and one out of curiosity...

    So my jacketed FV’s and BT have 3/4” fnpt glycol ports and my glycol pump has 1/2” lines. Is there any problem with stepping the circuit up/down at the input/output of the tanks?

    Also, just wondering what is inside those jackets? Is there tubing coiled all around the inner wall or is it just a void that floods or what?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Enterprise, Oregon
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    1,794
    1) Yes, No problem. Put any control valves on the input side of the jacket, which should be the top port. Isolation valves on the glycol lines will make your life much easier in the future.

    2) Look at the inside of your ferm. If you see little dimples or weld marks in a regular pattern on the ferm walls, you have a dimple-welded jacket. If you see spiral marks, its' a tube. If there are only weld marks around the outside of the jacket area, it's a straight, unsupported jacket and you will have problems with the jacket failing as it flexes at the welds.
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Capital Federa, Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Posts
    7
    Hello, would you say dimple jacket is the best solution to refrigerate the tank? Thanks.

    2) Look at the inside of your ferm. If you see little dimples or weld marks in a regular pattern on the ferm walls, you have a dimple-welded jacket. If you see spiral marks, its' a tube. If there are only weld marks around the outside of the jacket area, it's a straight, unsupported jacket and you will have problems with the jacket failing as it flexes at the welds.[/QUOTE]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Enterprise, Oregon
    Posts
    1,794
    We haven't used a spiral-welded jacket, so I can't comment on that.

    We had two ferms with jackets that were welded only at the perimeter, and both jackets failed after a few years in use. The field of the jacket would flex when pressurized (you could see and hear the POP when the solenoid opened once the cladding and insulation was removed), stressing the welds 'til they broke. One fermenter fractured into the inside of the ferm, allowing glycol to mix with the beer. Fortunately, I add blue dye to our glycol, so this was obvious when we pulled a sample of green beer.

    Since a dimple- or spiral-welded jacket is supported throughout the field, it won't flex like this. We've never had a dimple-welded jacket fail in over twenty years of operation.

    As for cooling efficiency, I suspect the various field-welded jacket do perform better due to the turbulence introduced, but I have no data to back this up.
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Capital Federa, Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Posts
    7
    Thanks for your input, Timm. Very helpful.
    We are currently working with our local welder to design a fermenter for our brewery and could use some comments from experienced brewers. I have no experience since till now we are working with plastic fermenters. So far I've learned that must haves are a PVRV, dry-hop ports, separate blow-off arm and was told that dimple jacket were the best but cannot confirm it. Will be focusing on the welding instead.
    Any other comments regarding well-made fermenters would be most appreciated.


    We had two ferms with jackets that were welded only at the perimeter, and both jackets failed after a few years in use. The field of the jacket would flex when pressurized (you could see and hear the POP when the solenoid opened once the cladding and insulation was removed), stressing the welds 'til they broke. One fermenter fractured into the inside of the ferm, allowing glycol to mix with the beer. Fortunately, I add blue dye to our glycol, so this was obvious when we pulled a sample of green beer.

    Since a dimple- or spiral-welded jacket is supported throughout the field, it won't flex like this. We've never had a dimple-welded jacket fail in over twenty years of operation.

    As for cooling efficiency, I suspect the various field-welded jacket do perform better due to the turbulence introduced, but I have no data to back this up.[/QUOTE]

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Enterprise, Oregon
    Posts
    1,794
    If your local welder is not thoroughly experienced--and preferably certified--in sanitary welding, go elsewhere. This is a whole 'nother ball game from most welding. You'd be much better off having the ferms fabricated by an established manufacturer of brewery equipment, or even buying used, than trying to deal with all the problems of an improperly designed and/or constructed tank.

    Been there, done that, and I do have have the T-shirt.
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

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