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Thread: How to set up Plate and Frame Filters

  1. #1
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    How to set up Plate and Frame Filters

    What is the correct way to operate plate and frame filters? After reading the instructions, and looking at the yeast deposits on the sheets, I am not sure our SOPs are giving optimal performance.

  2. #2
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    There is a bit of a "feel" to it, however the basics are pretty simple. If you elaborate on your current SOPs and problem details, we might be able to help a bit more.

    Here is a link to a video from Scott Laboratories on the process. Make sure your pads are facing the correct direction, wet them properly, don't over tighten, inlet on the low side, outlet on the high side. Using too fine of filtration sheets can result in high differential pressure. If you need finer filtration, use a diverter plate, or a separate filter step.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8veNLKB90o

  3. #3
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    Great video. Why is it recommended to wait no more than 48 hours to add membrane filtration (as we do)?

    The biggest issue I have with the SOPs is that the sheets are alternated so two course sides face each other, then two smooth sides, then this repeats. Then after the diversion plate, this pattern is inverted, two smooth then two rough. This is the bit I question. I can see on the dirt runs that the debris only ends up on every other frame.

    Also, the video touched on what might be the best way of keep life in the sheets for multiple runs. However, we do not have working pressure guages. What general tips are there for extending the life of the sheets?
    Last edited by Brewberosa; 03-03-2018 at 11:26 PM.

  4. #4
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    There are a lot of resources you can find on your own just by searching this site. I know I started or
    participated in a thread about filtering 12 or 13 years ago and I am sure there are a few other ones too.

    ......Not much has changed on the basic concept since then.


    JackK

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sauce View Post
    There are a lot of resources you can find on your own just by searching this site. I know I started or
    participated in a thread about filtering 12 or 13 years ago and I am sure there are a few other ones too.

    ......Not much has changed on the basic concept since then.


    JackK
    Any stickies?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brewberosa View Post
    Great video. Why is it recommended to wait no more than 48 hours to add membrane filtration (as we do)?

    The biggest issue I have with the SOPs is that the sheets are alternated so two course sides face each other, then two smooth sides, then this repeats. Then after the diversion plate, this pattern is inverted, tow smooth then two rough. This is the bit I question. I can see on the dirt runs that the debris only ends up on every other frame.

    Also, the video touched on what might be the best way of keep life in the sheets for multiple runs. However, we do not have working pressure guages. What general tips are there for extending the life of the sheets?
    Most likely reason to not wait more than 48 hours after primary filtration is to make sure no bacterial growth takes place that will clog up the membranes on a membrane filter. There may be other reasons as well.

    The sheets are alternated so that the inflow plate pushes beer into two filter sheets at one time and collects on two outflow plates. This entire concept is described in the video linked. They are inverted after the diverter plate because the outflow of stage 1 filter sheets becomes the inflow of stage 2 filter sheets. Outflow of stage 2 will come out the same side as the inflow of stage one. Rough sides of sheets should face the inflow plate, and this is where the debris (yeast, protein) will accumulate. The outflow plates will remain relatively clean as they are seeing only filtered beer (ideally).

    Without working pressure gauges you cannot "properly" filter. You do not know what the differential pressure on the sheets are, and greatly increase the risk of a breakthrough or blinding the filter (clogging). I would never use filter sheets for more than a single use in a plate and frame set up, unless you are running them immediately back to back. Even then I would be paying especially close attention to the differential pressure so that I could back flush before the "knee" if needed. Not worth the risk of contamination, pressure build up, or leakage potential if you ask me. If you want to re-use the filtration media, you are much better off with a lenticular or perhaps "DE" filter, IMHO.

  7. #7
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    Are you really using plate and frame filters, or are you using plate filters only? Reason I ask is there appears to be a lot of confusion (even if only to me!!) as plenty of people seem to call sheet only filtration plate and frame filters, instead of sheet only filters. If you have a definite cavity between the sheets, then this sort should be used with kieselguhr (or other powder). They are not suitable for backwashing as the sheets stretch during backwashing, or even tear where they are trapped between the plate and the frame. The two types are operated completely differently.
    dick

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dick murton View Post
    Are you really using plate and frame filters, or are you using plate filters only? Reason I ask is there appears to be a lot of confusion (even if only to me!!) as plenty of people seem to call sheet only filtration plate and frame filters, instead of sheet only filters. If you have a definite cavity between the sheets, then this sort should be used with kieselguhr (or other powder). They are not suitable for backwashing as the sheets stretch during backwashing, or even tear where they are trapped between the plate and the frame. The two types are operated completely differently.
    You are absolutely correct in this regard. I picked up bad habits. Most people in USA refer to a sheet filter as a “plate and frame”, but a true plate and frame would be almost like a mash filter that has sheets draped over the frame with a cavity to accept a powder filter aid (usually DE as we call it, or Kieselguhr). The sheets can be reused, however as Dick points out, they should not be backflushed. You open the filter and spray off the powder filter aid.

    I assume the bad habits of calling a sheet only filter “plate and frame” came about because they contain plates and a large “frame” that the plates sit on. The true plate and frame is more closely related to the “filter press”.

    DE, or Kieselguhr, appears to be disappearing in modern times due to health and environmental concerns, although it is plenty safe if used correctly, and there is plenty left in the world.

    Video linked is a sheet filter not a plate and frame. It tends to offer simplicity over DE/Kieselguhr dosed filters, but can cost more per HL/BBL and has some other trade offs.

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