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Thread: Aeration Iron Removal

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Oceanside, NY, USA
    Posts
    3

    Aeration Iron Removal

    Hi All,

    We have a sizable problem with what seems to be dissolved iron staining our equipment (HLT, process piping, etc) as well as disrupting magnetic flowmeters, not to mention how much better our beer could get.

    Culligan wants to soften the water, stating it's the only way to remove the iron. This will affect the overall water chemistry, which for us on Long Island is pretty perfect for a wide range of beers.

    I have heard of aeration iron removal systems where the incoming dissolved iron is oxidized, then filtered out through a membrane and then sand/carbon filter. This would leave the chemistry alone, and remove, iron, chlorine, etc.

    Our street psi on cold water is 45-50 at middle of cellar, with max flow rate for mash in/sparge at 40gpm blended.

    Does anyone have experience with this type of removal?

    Any thoughts would be appreciated. Cheers

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    78
    Greensand filter will remove iron.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    105
    I use Iron breakers. The water passes through a head of compressed air, oxidizing iron/manganese, it is then filtered through a media. Works. I still get a little staining in HLT, but my media could be wearing out. No need to soften.

    Cheers,

    Rich DeLano
    rich@thebrewinglair.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Carmel, IN
    Posts
    32
    Yes, aeration through some sort of aerator (cascade, bubble, tower, etc) can convert soluble iron into insoluble iron that can be filtered out of the water. Backflushable sand filters are often employed for the filtration. Aeration is often used in municipal systems where iron is a problem.

    Greensand also works, but is often a second choice. Greensand is also effective for manganese removal and that is more likely to invoke its use.
    WaterEng
    Engineering Consultant

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Minocqua WI
    Posts
    786
    Iron breaker or as I have heard them called Iron curtain - don't soften unless you want to also buy an RO. Your water will be way too high in sodium.
    I am having an Activated Carbon installed to remove municipal chlorine, my rep says it will also lower Iron? We'll see- I'm skeptical and anticipating adding an Iron curtain also.
    Brewmaster, Minocqua Brewing Company
    tbriggs@minocquabrewingcompany.com
    "Your results may vary"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Oceanside, NY, USA
    Posts
    3

    Re: Iron Breakers, Curtain, etc

    Thank you all for your responses. I forgot to mention in the original thread, does anyone see any issues with aerating all incoming water, hot or cold? (Hence increasing dissolved oxygen Past municipal levels) some of which will be cold water to be blended in mash in/sparge?

    Does anyone have an actual setup, or design of one of these aeration towers/ curtains?

    Thoughts?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Carmel, IN
    Posts
    32
    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Briggs View Post
    Iron breaker or as I have heard them called Iron curtain - don't soften unless you want to also buy an RO. Your water will be way too high in sodium.
    I am having an Activated Carbon installed to remove municipal chlorine, my rep says it will also lower Iron? We'll see- I'm skeptical and anticipating adding an Iron curtain also.
    I've never heard of iron being removed via activated carbon filtration. However, I've heard of activated carbon filters being nicely clogged by iron in the water.
    WaterEng
    Engineering Consultant

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH, USA
    Posts
    71
    Quote Originally Posted by WaterEng View Post
    I've never heard of iron being removed via activated carbon filtration. However, I've heard of activated carbon filters being nicely clogged by iron in the water.
    I'll second that.

    Russ
    Probrewer.com Advertising Supporter

    Buckeye Hydro
    Water Treatment Systems & Supplies
    www.BuckeyeHydro.com
    Info@buckeyehydro.com
    513-312-2343

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH, USA
    Posts
    71
    A softener can be used for dissolved (ferrous, Fe++) iron, as long as the iron concentration is low. But this really isn't the best approach. Have you resolved your situation?

    Russ
    Probrewer.com Advertising Supporter

    Buckeye Hydro
    Water Treatment Systems & Supplies
    www.BuckeyeHydro.com
    Info@buckeyehydro.com
    513-312-2343

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