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Thread: Is temperature vital when kegging from bright tank

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Idyllwild, CA, USA
    Posts
    123
    Quote Originally Posted by somenerve View Post
    One thing I’m not clear on with this method - what pressure should I set the the regulator that goes through the rotometer into the stone?
    While you can do it mathematically, I find it easier just to open the valve on the rotometer and then adjust my regulator to get the ball to float about 1/2 way up the scale. At my altitude, column height, temperature, etc., my 5BBL fermenters need about 20psi and my 10BBL about 22psi. The thing to be careful of is to NOT have more pressure than you need. Slow and steady is the way to go here.

    Cheers,
    --
    Don

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    70
    Excellent! Thanks for the input everybody!

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Nevada City, CA
    Posts
    307
    Quote Originally Posted by somenerve View Post
    One thing I’m not clear on with this method - what pressure should I set the the regulator that goes through the rotometer into the stone?
    Ideally it would be set at carb chart psi + wetting pressure of stone + elevation adjustment + static pressure adjustment. That said, in my case, I basically turn up the gas thru the rotometer until i can get it exactly half flow rate and then let it run. Takes 4-6 hours to get the roto to drop one level and the top pressure on the tank to rise ~1 psi. Pretty consistent.
    Dave Cowie
    Three Forks Bakery & Brewing Company
    Nevada City, CA

  4. #19
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    23
    Quote Originally Posted by somenerve View Post
    So basically just a length of tubing to reach to the bottom of the glass?
    No. A pigtail, also called a sampling coil, has a very long length of tube which is coiled up to keep it compact. The length is necessary to provide resistance to slow down the flow enough to get a good pour. It's basically doing the same job as the long beer line between cool-room and bar tap.

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