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Thread: Lowest DO canning line

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO, USA
    Posts
    10

    Lowest DO canning line

    Hello,

    My brewery is looking to get into canning this fall. I don't have much experience with it myself so any advice would be greatly appreciated.
    My biggest fear as I think every brewery's should be when getting into canning is high DO levels. I have seen many good breweries put out sub-par canned products because of this.
    Does anyone have any recommendations for brand/system that has the lowest or extremely low DO levels?
    We are looking into the 20ish-30ish cans per min. at the moment.

    Thanks,

    Vic

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    BEMIDJI, MN
    Posts
    115
    Hi Vic,

    Most current-model lines from the big 3 or 4 producers of inline-style fillers should be able to hit low DO numbers (dare I say 40 - 50ppb, shaken) IF you are able to consistently fill cans in a high quality manner - good CO2 purge without air mixing, lid-on-foam, under lid purge, lids tamped/pressed down, seamed in a very timely manner.

    That all being said, even the best canning lines can kick out high-DO cans if there is a chink in the armor, so to speak. If You have high DO in the brite tank, any air leaks/loose gaskets/etc in the product stream, air mixing during the purge, poor foam (that's a big one), low fills or inconsistent fills, missed lids, improper seam adjustment and probably a whole list of other variables you will end up with higher DO levels.

    For instance, during our canning line commissioning we measured our brite tank at 17ppb for an IPA (dry-hopped, hop recirculation, pushed w/ CO2 to the brite tank). Initial cans were coming off the line at 140 - 150 ppb, shaken, measured on a Hach Orbisphere. After adjusting our lid drop and lid-on-foam we were able to drop that to 45ppb quite quickly. Long story short, some pretty basic adjustments made a very big change in the DO measurement. Also, the presence of a DO meter during commissioning was key and certainly helped us have an "eye" for what a good fill looks like.

    Ultimately, a specific packaging line may be capable of producing very low DO numbers. However, there are a whole lot of variables that come into the mix that help you control those numbers and keep them where you want them. The unfortunate detail is that a DO meter ($$$) is usually the pathway to confidently arrive at that point : )

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    384
    + 10,000%

    I’ve seen people say this brand or that brand sucks (of the main three), however I have been able to see around the 45-50 ppb mentioned on all three if runnin properly. That’s without under-lid purging.

    IMHO, the Cask was very “user friendly” meaning less adjusting and less fluctuation, but the Goose offers the most operator control. That cuts both ways and can be very good or very bad. I like the Goose, but the others are viable options for sure. Goose is usually the priciest, the others are super close together. I believe you do get what you pay for, but it only helps if you know how to use it and care to.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO, USA
    Posts
    10
    Thanks guys, really good advice!

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