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Thread: Any benefit/ drawback from gradually crashing temp?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
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    Breckenridge, Colorado, usa
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    106

    Any benefit/ drawback from gradually crashing temp?

    Is there any reason to or not to gradually cold crash after diacetyl rest? Example 50 degs for a day, 40 for a day and 33 for a few? Or do people have better results going straight to 33? Thoughts ? Experiences? Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Louisville, KY
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    934
    Do you repitch your yeast?
    Joel Halbleib
    COO / Zymurgist
    Goodwood Brewing Co
    636 East Main St
    Louisville, KY
    goodwood.beer

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Conroe, Texas, USA
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    27
    For our lagers, we crash 2 degrees F per day during the week, 3 degrees F Mondays and Fridays, since no one does it over the weekend. It keeps the yeast healthy and happy for the next pitch. I haven't done any formal research, but I also assume that slowing down the crash also helps clean up whatever small amounts of diacetyl may be left after it can't be tasted.

  4. #4
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    Jun 2016
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    Breckenridge, Colorado, usa
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    Not repitching yet

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Chesterfield, UK
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    1,748
    Once the diacetyl rest is complete, generally the quicker you can remove the settled yeast, the better as there is less risk of autolysis, poor yeast viability and vitality if re-pitching, and off flavours from the autolysed yeast. 1 deg C / 2 F, seems to be a good rate of cooling - fast enough not to damage the yeast, or create ice on the chilling jackets, but fast enough to prevent autolysis during settlement, and fast enough to allow the yeast to settle rapidly not to get autolysis in the settled yeast, before sufficient has settled to make if worth / possible to remove the yeast sediment.
    dick

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
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    Breckenridge, Colorado, usa
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    106
    I see. So after d rest we went to 50 for a day and currently at 40 for another day and then 33 or so for a few more. Capped the blowoff/cip arm so it's all closed other thn the prv incase of something crazy. Kinda a related question now... once the cooling really settles out the remaining yeast/hops and we go to dump it what is the best way to account to the loss of volume in the fv? Opening the valve at the blowoff/cip would suck in unwanted o2 correct? Shoule we slowly push in co2 through the blowoff? Sorry guys 1st time with the unitank!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    New Orleans, LA
    Posts
    2
    Do you have a pressure gauge on your blowoff/CIP arm? If there ends up being negative pressure in the tank you will suck air. We usually keep our tanks with a head of 5 psi once they are cold crashed and resting. We pressurize with CO2 through the CIP arm if we need to bump up the head pressure.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Palau
    Posts
    1,937

    Preferred methodology, especially for wheat beers...

    Many, if not most, traditional wheat beer makers use a slower crash as matter of SOP. I've used a slower crash for beers for many years.

    You should also investigate spunding your tanks. Then there is no question of negative fermenter pressure. You will also obtain finer foam and less CO2 waste. Best of luck!
    Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--

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