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Thread: What is the best way to install temp probes into your vessels?

  1. #1
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    What is the best way to install temp probes into your vessels?

    Does anyone have any advise on the best way to secure these wire temp probes into the sensor ports on the sides of the fermenters and boil kettles ect? Do they just insert loose or is there a good way to secure them in place?


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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaleenBrewing View Post
    Does anyone have any advise on the best way to secure these wire temp probes into the sensor ports on the sides of the fermenters and boil kettles ect? Do they just insert loose or is there a good way to secure them in place?


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    Are they threaded? If so I like these from McMaster https://www.mcmaster.com/#liquid-tig...grips/=1ega12r. If there is no thread then I would just use some silicone. Don't forget heat transfer paste inside on the probe.

  3. #3
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    Now I wish they were threaded. Thanks for the reply it's good stuff and very useful. I appreciate it.
    Alex

  4. #4
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    Have a sanitary welder weld on tri-clover fittings so you can remove and clean the probes every brew.

    Avoid threads at all cost especially in the fermenter.

    Single shell is very easy but a double shell insulated tank is still not a problem.

    If you're lucky, a welder can just weld a tri-clover cap with a hole drilled through onto the existing ports.

    Then epoxy glue you're probes inside tri-clover thermowells.

    Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
    JC McDowell
    Bandit Brewing Co.- 3bbl brewery and growing
    Darby, MT- population 700
    OPENED Black Friday 2014!

  5. #5
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    That looks like a thermowell that is welded through the wall. If so, it looks like there's enough sticking out that you can cut male pipe threads on the outside of the pipe, and then thread a conduit coupling in place. On the other end of the coupling, thread a liquid tight flex coupling, and run liquid tight flex to your control panel. This will protect the relatively delicate probe wires.

    Edit: They also make compression style conduit fittings for rigid conduit, which might eliminate the need for threading.

    Regards,
    Mike Sharp

  6. #6
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    Here's how we do it:

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    You'll need to thread the thermowell (why wasn't this done at the factory?) to 1/2" NPT, either inside or out depending on the dia. of the thermowell stub. Stainless, especially 304/316, is very difficult to thread. Use a cutting fluid specified for stainless and go very slowly--a fraction of a turn, then reverse a quarter turn, then another fraction ad nauseum.

    The water-resistant junction box is a common electrical part. The watertight fitting came from an electronics supplier. The wire is a special RTD wire, which is pretty spendy, but tough enough it doesn't need to be in conduit.

    You should also have temp probes that fir your thermowell. They come in various lengths, and you can order a custom length if needed. The thermo probe should be in contact with the far end of the well, with a spring to keep it there:

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    The thermowell needs to be sealed to prevent room air from entering, which will cause false temp readings. A gob of thermal transfer paste on the end of the probe is good practice, too.
    Last edited by TGTimm; 10-11-2018 at 10:14 AM.
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

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