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Thread: Replacement Labeler, wet-glue?

  1. #1
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    Replacement Labeler, wet-glue?

    Our current labeler is a World Tandem and it is dying a slow death and parts are getting harder to find. We've been running it for about 20 years and I think it is time for an upgrade. I'm looking to find something similar that would fit into the same space. Are there any wet glue labelers that are worth looking at for around $11K. Output could be the same or slightly slower than the World Tandem. I found some on but they are ordered from China and have very little info.

  2. #2
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    Have you checked out pressure sensitive labels? You can get a new unit for ~$15,000. With the right substrate glue, and preferably labeling before filling, you can forget about cold-glue labellers.
    Linus Hall
    Yazoo Brewing
    Nashville, TN
    [url]www.yazoobrew.com[/url]

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by lhall View Post
    Have you checked out pressure sensitive labels? You can get a new unit for ~$15,000. With the right substrate glue, and preferably labeling before filling, you can forget about cold-glue labellers.
    Yes, but the pressure sensitive labels are about 4x the price and our packaging costs are already high.

  4. #4
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    We went from a World Tandem (I feel you pain) to a pressure-sensitive labeler a few years back. We couldn't be happier, and our customers are very pleased, too.

    Paper labels just suck, and most liquid glues are horrible, after a few days in the cooler. I keep a full cooler in my own rig for the warmer months (emergency rations), and after a week on ice, the labels are scraps and the glue has begun to decay and release the scent of death.

    With the right substrate and glue, PS labels last for weeks in the cooler, and don't rot and stink when they do break down.

    The PS labels are also nice stickers to give away or sell.

    The rotary in-line labeler is also simplicity in itself, especially after using a cantankerous, clanking, dangerous machine like the WT. Most adjustments are set it and forget it--just the way I like them.
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by TGTimm View Post
    We went from a World Tandem (I feel you pain) to a pressure-sensitive labeler a few years back. We couldn't be happier, and our customers are very pleased, too.

    Paper labels just suck, and most liquid glues are horrible, after a few days in the cooler. I keep a full cooler in my own rig for the warmer months (emergency rations), and after a week on ice, the labels are scraps and the glue has begun to decay and release the scent of death.

    With the right substrate and glue, PS labels last for weeks in the cooler, and don't rot and stink when they do break down.

    The PS labels are also nice stickers to give away or sell.

    The rotary in-line labeler is also simplicity in itself, especially after using a cantankerous, clanking, dangerous machine like the WT. Most adjustments are set it and forget it--just the way I like them.
    Agreed, I really hate the wet-glue labeler, but I'm trying to do my due diligence to find a replacement and making sure I've checked out my options. WG labelers just aren't that prevalent anymore.

    Which PS labeler did you switch to?

  6. #6
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    The price difference is not that bad - our labels are around 2.2 cents each. Cut & stack used to be around 1 cent. We had an old Krones Rotina and messing with the glue every day was a nightmare. And we'd have to rerun bottles where the label went on crooked and got folded over. One year, I went back and compared how many labels we had bought vs how many bottles sold. I think we bought 15% more labels than bottles, so like an 85% success rate. We bought an Inline pressure sensitive labeller and are much happier.
    Linus Hall
    Yazoo Brewing
    Nashville, TN
    [url]www.yazoobrew.com[/url]

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by lhall View Post
    The price difference is not that bad - our labels are around 2.2 cents each. Cut & stack used to be around 1 cent. We had an old Krones Rotina and messing with the glue every day was a nightmare. And we'd have to rerun bottles where the label went on crooked and got folded over. One year, I went back and compared how many labels we had bought vs how many bottles sold. I think we bought 15% more labels than bottles, so like an 85% success rate. We bought an Inline pressure sensitive labeller and are much happier.
    Yeah, good point. I'll calculate in the rate of loss and glue to my figures on the labels. We are probably around 85% loss. Not to mention the amount of time that it takes to clean up the machine at the end of the day when it is covered in glue and labels. Man, I hate that machine, and I've been working on it since 2003!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikeyrb1 View Post
    Agreed, I really hate the wet-glue labeler, but I'm trying to do my due diligence to find a replacement and making sure I've checked out my options. WG labelers just aren't that prevalent anymore.

    Which PS labeler did you switch to?
    We bought a CVC 300 from Westmark. I'm not sure I want to endorse this machine--we had too many start-up problems and what I felt was poor support. The MB on it died after about a month--and they tried to claim it was due to an employee bending the door hinges on the controls box (I had ordered replacements). No water or other liquids ever touched the box, and somehow the bent hinge caused the MB to go?

    We were early adopters, but that's getting hard to avoid when buying production equipment these days.

    After the first few months we finally got the machine up and running to the point is requires very little supervision.

    Moving to a PS labeler allowed us to eliminate one position on the bottling line--that is enough savings right there to off-set any increase in label price. As mentioned above, we have very few bad labels (often none) compared to the cold-glue WT. More savings.
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TGTimm View Post
    We bought a CVC 300 from Westmark. I'm not sure I want to endorse this machine--we had too many start-up problems and what I felt was poor support. The MB on it died after about a month--and they tried to claim it was due to an employee bending the door hinges on the controls box (I had ordered replacements). No water or other liquids ever touched the box, and somehow the bent hinge caused the MB to go?

    We were early adopters, but that's getting hard to avoid when buying production equipment these days.

    After the first few months we finally got the machine up and running to the point is requires very little supervision.

    Moving to a PS labeler allowed us to eliminate one position on the bottling line--that is enough savings right there to off-set any increase in label price. As mentioned above, we have very few bad labels (often none) compared to the cold-glue WT. More savings.
    Do you guys apply labels before filling? Seems like that's how most people are dealing with it and that makes sense.

  10. #10
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    Yes. It does result in a slightly higher wastage of labels, but saves on space and money for an air-knife bottle dryer. Even with the air knife, there will still be adhesion problems due to condensation on the bottles.
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

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