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Thread: Help identifying a “square” looking cell on a hemo-slide

  1. #1
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    Sep 2012
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    Help identifying a “square” looking cell on a hemo-slide

    I scoped some yeast from a wet hopped beer, the wet hops were in a hop back before the heat X at 170 degrees. I’m seeing some scattered “square” looking cells among the yeast. I centered two of them in this picture. Any idea what they are?


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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Minocqua WI
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    Yeast sizes vary greatly, depending on species and environment, typically measuring 3–4 µm in diameter,
    Bacilli are rod-shaped bacteria. Bacilli all divide in one plane producing a bacillus, streptobacillus, or coccobacillus arrangement (see Fig. 7). An average bacillus is 0.5-1.0 µm wide by 1.0-4.0 µm long.
    That's my guess.
    Brewmaster, Minocqua Brewing Company
    tbriggs@minocquabrewingcompany.com
    "Your results may vary"

  3. #3
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    Do they move when you watch them under the scope?

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  4. #4
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    There is no movement what so ever. They are too big to be bacillus right? Bacillus would be very hard to see at this power

  5. #5
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    Probably not bacteria if they're not moving. Without a higher mag my guess would be plant cells from the hops or some sort of non biological debris.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Palau
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    Crystalline?

    Could this be some form of crystalline structure such as calcium oxalate (doesn't that present like this) or other? Seems too small and regular to be organic. Have you tried acid in serial dilution to break flocs? If so, then maybe not as I believe this would dissolve oxalate. If not, try a higher magnification to see if there are any optic planes that would identify as crystalline structures.
    Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--

  7. #7
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    Sep 2012
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    plant cell seems most likely now that I think about it. We ran this through a hopsack at 40psi with a diaghragm pump so it would make sense if we pushed some organic material through.
    I did not do any acid dilution to break up flocs- it usually doesn't work great for me for some reason so I stopped doing it.

    One thing that struck me as odd was how low viability these cells were. the pitch was a third generation top cropped slurry. I expected this bottom crop to be very healthy. After I saw this I was wondering if something in the hops is not agreeing with the yeast. Prompting me to ask my grower if she uses any chemicals.

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