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Thread: Possible to pitch an existing flat slab? Or total re-pour?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Colombia
    Posts
    2

    Possible to pitch an existing flat slab? Or total re-pour?

    Hi Guys, I'm in the process of getting a large scale kombucha (well...large scale for kombucha) operation off the ground. Here's the question: has anybody added pitch to an existing slab? Is it even feasible? Or am I looking at a total demo and re-pour to get the pitch I need for drainage?

    Any advice would be much appreciated!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Polson, Montana, USA
    Posts
    1,303
    Hi Gringo,
    Completely possible. I had a sloped floor with a 20’ trench drain poured on an existing flat slab. Works great!

    Prost!
    Dave
    Glacier Brewing Company
    406-883-2595
    glacierbrewing@bresnan.net

    "who said what now?"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Colombia
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by GlacierBrewing View Post
    Hi Gringo,
    Completely possible. I had a sloped floor with a 20’ trench drain poured on an existing flat slab. Works great!

    Prost!
    Dave
    Hi Dave, thanks for the info. Any more specifics on what you did? Material used, slope info, etc?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Polson, Montana, USA
    Posts
    1,303
    Quote Originally Posted by Gringo View Post
    Hi Dave, thanks for the info. Any more specifics on what you did? Material used, slope info, etc?
    We hired a local concrete contractor to pour and slope the floor. I seem to remember the “mix” was thicker than a normal pour to hold the gradual slope. We purchased a trench drain system from NRS and installed it in the center of the floor. Prior to the initial pour, we scrubbed the old slab with muratic acid to etch it so the new concrete would bond better with it. Wear PPE and have a lot of active ventilation!
    Prost!
    Dave
    Glacier Brewing Company
    406-883-2595
    glacierbrewing@bresnan.net

    "who said what now?"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Kent, WA
    Posts
    311
    I've also heard anecdotally about using a "slabjack" approach where the floor is saw cut, and then jacked up to slope. The slab would have to be worth keeping, though. One local brewery poured a secondary sloped floor on top of the flat floor. It has curbs and rails around the perimeter. If I recall correctly, they did it so that the sloped floors could be removed if they move out. It looks nice, but you have to step up to the brew deck, so you might have issues with forklifts or pallet jacks.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Adelaide Hills, Australia
    Posts
    14
    Are you renting/leasing?

    Do you need to revert back to original once lease runs out at your cost?

    Keep in mind too, pouring ontop means you'll have a step up into your wet area. Or have a ramp up to the higher edge.

    Just a few more things to bear in mind, 2c and all. Cheers!

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