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Thread: collapsed hose

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    32

    collapsed hose

    I just purchased some use brewery hose from an auction and one of the hoses is collapsed. Is there any chance of repairing? I was thinking of trying to use an air compressor to pressurize it to see if it will expand back to a usable state. Please let me know if anyone has any experience with this. I think it may have been run over with a forklift because it is only collapsed in only one area.

    Thanks
    Jason

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    394
    The hoses you typically see will probably have a steel wire reinforcement spiraling down them. This helps build suction stability for the hose. It’s likely the wire has been bent significantly and it would be questionable to repair as is. You could cut and re-flange new hose ends, but I’d strongly suggest a hydraulic swage as opposed to hose barbs and band-its. If only planning to use in non critical areas, hose barbs and band-its may suffice.

    As a side note, you would be better to pressurize with water than an air compressor to attempt a re-inflate. It’s safer, and less likely to blow a hole in the hose membrane.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by UnFermentable View Post
    The hoses you typically see will probably have a steel wire reinforcement spiraling down them. This helps build suction stability for the hose. It’s likely the wire has been bent significantly and it would be questionable to repair as is. You could cut and re-flange new hose ends, but I’d strongly suggest a hydraulic swage as opposed to hose barbs and band-its. If only planning to use in non critical areas, hose barbs and band-its may suffice.

    As a side note, you would be better to pressurize with water than an air compressor to attempt a re-inflate. It’s safer, and less likely to blow a hole in the hose membrane.
    Can you please share more information about hose couplings and hydraulic swage?
    I have couple of braided hoses that needs to be flanged for keg washer and due to strong and aggressive working regime there I am skeptical about using regular barbs connections.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Chesterfield, UK
    Posts
    1,801
    google brewery hygienic hose and you will get various options

    these two are examples of UK suppliers

    http://m.pirtek.co.uk/downloads/prod...0Couplings.pdf

    http://www.brewflex.com/
    dick

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    20
    I know there are manufacturers but I though to DIY.. if its possible.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Chesterfield, UK
    Posts
    1,801
    It is possible, BUT, to do it reasonably safely, you need proper banding material, a (manual) banding machine and the ability to insert hose tails into the hoses to a sufficient length to be safe, and without damaging the lining, which according to the engineers at a couple of places I have worked, is easily done. pre-prepared hoses will normally be pressure tested and certified at point of manufacture to 5 bar or more.
    dick

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Enterprise, Oregon
    Posts
    1,828
    Don't even consider it. Brewery hoses are already one of the hardest pieces of brewery equipment to clean. Toss it and don't look back.

    Moreover, buying used hoses is highly questionable, especially if one has been crushed. Yep, crushed--typical brewery hoses cannot be collapsed in use. As mentioned above, they have a spiral wire reinforcement in the walls to prevent this. To crush one, you need to run it over or have a very heavy person step on it. This would indicate to me that these hoses were poorly cared for, by a person who doesn't care if they sell you a brewhouse infection. Ever wonder why they were for sale in the first place? Failed brewery?

    Carefully inspect all those hoses, or, better yet, toss them and buy new brewery hoses w/hydraulically swaged ends. You can look back on this as a very expensive learning experience.

    We had a whole-brewhouse infection that we traced back to our hand-banded brewery hoses. We dumped hundreds of barrels of infected beer--which is not an easy process itself. It took us over a month to catch up on productions. Cost was in the $100K range.

    Do you want to go through this experience?

    We now replace all our hoses every 4-5 years, with internally swaged tri-clamp fittings. Our latest batch came from CPE. Very well made, competitively priced and just great professionals to deal with. They have a very good deal on Goodyear Vintners hose right now.
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

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