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Thread: Increased lag phase when dry-hopping

  1. #1
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    Oct 2017
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    Increased lag phase when dry-hopping

    Hey everyone

    I have been doing some experiments with putting a fairly substantial amount of the dry-hop load in the fermenter when knocking out into the tank. So that the hops are in the wort before fermentation begins.
    But interestingly I have noticed a substantial increase in the lag phase, when doing this technique.
    Now the yeast ferment within normal parameters, and final gravity is on target, it just seems to increase the lag phase. Pitch rates and yeast are the same as in previous batches, where I didn't perform this.

    Normally fermentation is going within 12 hours, but with knocking out on to dry-hops, sometimes the lag phase is as much as 24-30 hours, before I log a drop in gravity.

    Does anyone have an idea as to why this might be?

    My own idea is a combination of, that the hop oils slightly interfere with the yeasts uptake of oxygen and glucose in the lag phase, and as such the adaptation of the yeast will take longer. Or perhaps the polyphenols in some of the hops absorb some of the oxygen that the yeast needs for sterol synthesis.

    It's not really a problem apart from slightly longer tank time, but I find it really interesting.

    Any ideas?

  2. #2
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    How did the beer taste compared to previous batch and what percentage of dry hop did you add before transfer?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  3. #3
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    Oct 2015
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    I've never heard of anyone adding dry hops during knock out. You may consider adding them at the end of fermentation or after yeast drop then you can roust them with CO2.

  4. #4
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    I suspect the yeast is simply attracted to the hops and if the hops sink to the bottom, carry the yeast to the bottom so far less remains in suspension - effectively making it underpitched. I doubt very much if the hops interfere in the way you suggest. Dry hop later so you don't smother / drag down the yeast. You will "boil off" some of the aromas during active fermentation by adding early anyway, so are also wasting hops.
    dick

  5. #5
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    Oct 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob C View Post
    I've never heard of anyone adding dry hops during knock out. You may consider adding them at the end of fermentation or after yeast drop then you can roust them with CO2.
    I already do that as well. This is mostly an experiment to maximize any biotransformations there might be occurring during fermentation.
    At the end of fermentation the rest of the dry hops are added and the cone is bubbled with CO2 like on other dry-hopped beers.

  6. #6
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    Oct 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeachBrew View Post
    How did the beer taste compared to previous batch and what percentage of dry hop did you add before transfer?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I add around 1/4-1/3 of the dry-hop load into the fermenter before knock out.
    What I find is a substantial increase in what I would call "hop flavor". Some of the aroma from that load is for sure lost due to CO2 scrubbing, but there are some kind of yeast driven action going on, that retains flavor, that I normally don't get from late dry-hopping.
    If this is bio transformation or not, I am not sure sure, but it gives a very different hop character, than with just normal dry-hopping.

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