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Thread: NE IPA Dry Hopping Method

  1. #1
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    NE IPA Dry Hopping Method

    Hi all, i wonder if i could get some advice from you guys? I'm currently and have been brewing a NE IPA with #4lbs/BBL of Dry Hopping whilst utilizing the Vermont 4000 Yeast strain.
    The method for dry hopping is to strip all the yeast then add all #4lbs/bbl dry hop and recirculate gently over night. After 2 days i cold crash the tank to 30F... add some top pressure then begin to strip hops the next day. It typically takes up to 5 days for all the hops to drop out.

    The result is a low yield with a lot of the "Haze Profile" being lost in the beer. In comparison to other NE IPAs out there it doesn't seem to have the same flavor profile.
    Is there a better more efficient way to dry hop?

    Note* A total of 15% of wheat and oats for protein haze.
    Fermentation @ 65F till the end of Fermentation
    Then raise to diacetyl rest
    After 2 days drop to 50F
    After 2 days crop yeast put the rest to drain
    Dry hop.....

    Thanks for your help...

  2. #2
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    I only use #2/barrel on my hazy. I get good results fermenting with American ale yeast @76F and dry hopping 1 degree plato above finishing target. Let that circulate for 3 or 4 days. Drop to 60F and cap. Dump hops and yeast then dump in 2nd dose of dry hops. Roust with CO2 for 7 days then cold crash over two days. At 50 degrees your flavor and aroma extraction is going to be lower than at warmer temps.
    Last edited by Rob C; 12-17-2018 at 10:17 AM.

  3. #3
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    One of our NE IPAs utilizes 3# / barrel, our SOP in general is 1/3 of the hops "whirlpool" (really just recirc for us since we use the cylindroconical BREWHA system) at 170F for 30', 1/3 during fermentation starting at approximately 3/4 of the way through predicted attenuation (usually 2 - 3 Plato from terminal gravity) and finishing 1 day after terminal gravity is reached, cold crash to drop out suspended particulates, raise temp back up to ~60F, then the remaining 1/3 of the hop bill is added to the fermenter with "near beer" recirculation for approximately 6 hours. Chill again to drop out particulates, then move to the serving vessels (kegs for us). Aroma and flavor has been very good for us following this protocol.

    Cheers,

    Joe

  4. #4
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    Thanks so much for your replies, it's definitely food for thought.

    Since the post i've started to isolate said IPA tank and drain glycol from those jackets. I'm then running hot liquor through the jackets to raise the temp to 70F before dry hopping.
    A quick 30 Min procedure that seems to have given me better flavor extraction.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by StormCrow View Post
    Thanks so much for your replies, it's definitely food for thought.

    Since the post i've started to isolate said IPA tank and drain glycol from those jackets. I'm then running hot liquor through the jackets to raise the temp to 70F before dry hopping.
    A quick 30 Min procedure that seems to have given me better flavor extraction.
    If you want good flavor extraction then dry hop during fermentation. No need to cook your beer and send expensive glycol down the drain. This seems like a lot to go through for something as straight forward as a dry hop. You could also just dry hop when the beer is still warm. 80% of the point of a NEIPA is the early active ferment dry hops to give you the bio-transformation and achieve the flavors associated with the style. Part of the reason why these beers are more costly to produce is not just an obscene and wasteful amount of hops but also the inability to get a good yeast harvest. Take the harvesting out of the equation and I think you'll find you get a more flavorful and true to style NEIPA (whatever that means *sarcasm*).

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by soia1138 View Post
    If you want good flavor extraction then dry hop during fermentation. No need to cook your beer and send expensive glycol down the drain. This seems like a lot to go through for something as straight forward as a dry hop. You could also just dry hop when the beer is still warm. 80% of the point of a NEIPA is the early active ferment dry hops to give you the bio-transformation and achieve the flavors associated with the style. Part of the reason why these beers are more costly to produce is not just an obscene and wasteful amount of hops but also the inability to get a good yeast harvest. Take the harvesting out of the equation and I think you'll find you get a more flavorful and true to style NEIPA (whatever that means *sarcasm*).
    +1 on this. I've been doing 1/2 of my dry hop addition on day 1 or 2 of fermentation, following the remainder of the DH post fermentation, prior to crashing for about 5 days. not only is the aroma improved but the difference in flavor is out of this world.
    As for keeping the beer hazy, i've been doing 30-40% wheat and 10-15% oats which seems to keep the beer from clearing up even sitting cold over a couple weeks

  7. #7
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    Forester Fall, ON
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    How are you all adding hops during fermentation? Do you push in with a vessel or are you dropping ii from the top. If dropping through the top port, do you have issues with nucleation causing beer lose?
    Cheers,

    Sean Goddard
    Brewmaster
    Whitewater Brewing Co. LTD

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by wlw33 View Post
    +1 on this. I've been doing 1/2 of my dry hop addition on day 1 or 2 of fermentation, following the remainder of the DH post fermentation, prior to crashing for about 5 days. not only is the aroma improved but the difference in flavor is out of this world.
    As for keeping the beer hazy, i've been doing 30-40% wheat and 10-15% oats which seems to keep the beer from clearing up even sitting cold over a couple weeks
    We are also struggling with keeping haze in our NEIPA. My original recipe uses around 20% flaked oats, 4lb/bbl hops and London III yeast. Whirlpool about 40% hops, dry hop 40% 24-36 hours after yeast is pitched (we've been playing with the timing to see if that makes a difference) then 20% dry hops Cryo Pellets after FG is reached. For your wheat and oat additions, are these flaked? I just did a batch with 40% flaked oats, my efficiency tanked I'm guessing because of how gelatinous the mash was. I used rice hulls but maybe not enough. Never had a stuck mash, it was just different, very gooey.

  9. #9
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    My 1st dry hop is done from 1 to 2 degrees plato above desired finishing gravity. We drop in from top. You just got to be careful here you may want to drop in a 1/3 to 1/2 and cap to see how the yeast responds. If it blows up wait 15 min. and add the rest.

    We don't have problems losing haze for the first 2 months. We use flaked oats and flaked red wheat with American ale yeast.

  10. #10
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    Red face Dry Hopping Calculation

    How to Predict Bu after Dry Hopping?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ankurnapa View Post
    How to Predict Bu after Dry Hopping?
    Dry hopping does not effect IBU. Alpha acids are isomerized during the boil, and the amount isomerized is dependent on temperature and time.

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