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Thread: Rapid Oxidation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Fall River, MA, USA
    Posts
    6

    Rapid Oxidation

    Today we packaged five barrels of IPA into cans with no problem after completing we package two barrels in kegs that are been cleaned on a ABE keg commander the day before. Two hours later the kegs were put on service on lines of just been cleaned and the beer was completely oxidized and I am dumbfounded as to what would cause rapid oxidation like that if anybody has any ideas please reach out to me because I need to figure this out.


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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    417
    Quote Originally Posted by Ellismr View Post
    Today we packaged five barrels of IPA into cans with no problem after completing we package two barrels in kegs that are been cleaned on a ABE keg commander the day before. Two hours later the kegs were put on service on lines of just been cleaned and the beer was completely oxidized and I am dumbfounded as to what would cause rapid oxidation like that if anybody has any ideas please reach out to me because I need to figure this out.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    First off, how do you know the cans are good? Did you measure anything with a DO meter? Before and during packaging?

    If you believe it is limited to the kegs, I would have to guess that the kegs were not purged with CO2 properly before you filled them. Air in the keg would mix during filling, and potentially show up quite early. The higher the polyphenol content and protein content, the faster this will show up.

    If the kegs were cleaned hot and allowed to cool with no pressure applied to the keg, it can create a vacuum that pulls air into the keg by way of the rubber seal.

    Another common issue is that when running automated keg washers for extended periods, the CO2 Dewar can actually freeze up turning the liquid CO2 into Dry Ice. The solid converts to gas much slower than the liquid, and this causes a pressure drop on the supply line. The tank regulator can read 0 even-though you may well be close to full. You'll notice this by checking the last few kegs off your run. If they are under vacuum or lack pressure, this can be a main cause.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    34
    Is it possible that there was residual PAA in the kegs?

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