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Thread: Adding vessels to increase throughput on brewday

  1. #1
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    Adding vessels to increase throughput on brewday

    I have a 3bbl, 3 vessel system, and only brew on the weekends. I am thinking of adding a whirlpool kettle (without heating) to speed up multi brew brewdays. Any suggestions are appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Brian

  2. #2
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    With your current setup are you waiting on emptying the kettle to finish the second mash/lauter? How long does it take to whirlpool currently? You still have to account for the time it takes to transfer from the kettle to the whirlpool, so the only real time you would save is how long you whirlpool for.

  3. #3
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    You might also look into a wort receiver. You can lauter your second batch of wort into it while you're boiling/whirlpooling/knocking out, and then transfer it into the kettle once the first batch is all in the fermenter and the kettle is clean. You'd just need a kettle to collect the wort, not a specially designed vessel with a proper dish in the bottom, trub dam, draw port at the correct spot, possibly more piping and a pump. Your mileage may vary, but you'd probably save the same amount of time as adding a whirlpool.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigBBrew View Post
    I am thinking of adding a whirlpool kettle (without heating) to speed up multi brew brewdays.
    Lets say the time for operations are:

    mash in 15 min
    mash rest 60 min
    runoff time 60 min

    Heat kettle 30 min
    Boil 60 min

    pump to whirlpool 10 min
    whirlpool rest 30 min
    cool wort 30 min



    without a whirlpool you can only start runoff when the kettle is empty. doing a second brew saves you the mash in and mash rest time of 75 min.

    if you have a whirlpool, then you can start running off the second brew after pumping to the whirlpool. you can save an extra 60 min of time.

    1 brew: 4h 55min
    2 brew no whirlpool: 8h 35 min (4:17/ brew)

    2 brew with whirlpool: 7h 35 min (3:47/brew)


    if you do 3 brews it is even better.
    3 brew with whirlpool: 10:15 (3:25/ brew)


    more or less.

    the other option would be a wort collection grant or a second kettle with/ without whirlpool.

    we had a 2 kettle nanobrewery and we could do 4 brews in just over 10 hours.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Weehe View Post
    With your current setup are you waiting on emptying the kettle to finish the second mash/lauter? How long does it take to whirlpool currently? You still have to account for the time it takes to transfer from the kettle to the whirlpool, so the only real time you would save is how long you whirlpool for.
    My biggest loss of time is the amount of time it takes to bring the wort to a boil. It Is taking around 1 to 1.5 hrs just to get to a decent boil. Iíve run 10 batches total on this system and havenít had had what Iíd say is a glitch free brew day.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigBBrew View Post
    My biggest loss of time is the amount of time it takes to bring the wort to a boil. It Is taking around 1 to 1.5 hrs just to get to a decent boil. Iíve run 10 batches total on this system and havenít had had what Iíd say is a glitch free brew day.
    Without knowing what your system is I would suggest looking into better ways to heat the kettle. Or a better way to keep the wort from cooling before going into the kettle. Unless I am missing something, a non-heated whirlpool tank might save you 30min a batch.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigBBrew View Post
    My biggest loss of time is the amount of time it takes to bring the wort to a boil. It Is taking around 1 to 1.5 hrs just to get to a decent boil. Iíve run 10 batches total on this system and havenít had had what Iíd say is a glitch free brew day.
    You should have stated that from the beginning. Why would you waste money on anything else at this point. Focus on your heat source. At 3bbl you should be having issues with NOT boiling before your lauter is complete. One to 1.5 hours to boil is just insane. Who made the system? What is the heat source for the kettle. You don't need more vessels, you need less that actually work.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by soia1138 View Post
    You should have stated that from the beginning. Why would you waste money on anything else at this point. Focus on your heat source. At 3bbl you should be having issues with NOT boiling before your lauter is complete. One to 1.5 hours to boil is just insane. Who made the system? What is the heat source for the kettle. You don't need more vessels, you need less that actually work.
    Iím sorry for wasting everyoneís time. I was thinking the exasct same thing as I was re-reading my post. My runoff is 168-170f into the kettle. I have a Stout direct fire propanewith Ward Burners. I start the burner after kettle is 1/4th full. I donít to want to scorch the wort.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigBBrew View Post
    Iím sorry for wasting everyoneís time. I was thinking the exasct same thing as I was re-reading my post. My runoff is 168-170f into the kettle. I have a Stout direct fire propanewith Ward Burners. I start the burner after kettle is 1/4th full. I donít to want to scorch the wort.
    I have a friend with a Stout 7bbl. It's terrible on getting to a boil. Absolutely poor design. I would focus on that for certain, it's your biggest issue by a huge margin.

  10. #10
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    See if you can put higher btu burners on it. Ideal would be hitting boil as the last of your runoff enters the kettle or slightly sooner.
    Joel Halbleib
    Partner / Zymurgist
    Hive and Barrel Meadery
    6302 Old La Grange Rd
    Crestwood, KY
    www.hiveandbarrel.com

  11. #11
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    If burner is properly sized for the volume it could be burner distance from the kettle or flame pattern or not enough gas supply... check the burner manual and call burner tech support to get help.

  12. #12
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    Thanks for all the input. We are in the process of moving our brewhouse into a new building closer to our taproom with a bigger propane tank, and supply line. (I dont think this will make any difference but i wont make any changes until after starting back up. I'll call Mark at Ward after that.

    Thanks,
    Brian

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigBBrew View Post
    Thanks for all the input. We are in the process of moving our brewhouse into a new building closer to our taproom with a bigger propane tank, and supply line. (I dont think this will make any difference but i wont make any changes until after starting back up. I'll call Mark at Ward after that.

    Thanks,
    Brian
    It's very possible your propane tank won't supply enough propane to meet your demand. If you see frost forming on the tank, this could indicate the problem. Bigger would help, but your propane supplier may be able to help you out as well once you get in your new location. You might need a propane vaporizer.

    Regards,
    Mike Sharp

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