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Thread: High gravity precision hydrometer source?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Strongsville, Ohio
    Posts
    285

    High gravity precision hydrometer source?

    Hey all,


    Specifically looking for a temp corrected hydrometer in the range of say....23.5p to 32p?


    You know, to round out what we all have (0p-8.5p, 8p-16p, 15.5p-24p)


    Would like to get away from the super course proof hydrometer we use when brewing the occasional huge beer.

    Thanks

    JackK


    p.s. You'd think with the trend to bigger beers over the last 6 years this would be available
    Last edited by Sauce; 04-03-2019 at 09:46 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Strongsville, Ohio
    Posts
    285
    ok, I did a generic search which I should done first and found some on grainger (brix and SP) with high ranges, but they are not temp correcting and are $96.08 each

    https://www.grainger.com/category/la...searchBar=true




    ..and this from brewcraft. price not available without filling out a form (14p-30p)



    https://shop.brewcraftusa.com/brewcr...060-1130-55381
    Last edited by Sauce; 04-03-2019 at 10:11 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Conroe, Texas, USA
    Posts
    27
    I've had a hard time finding good hydrometers, especially that aren't super expensive. We don't do much brewing over 20 P or so, but there have been occasions when we needed it. My method is to take the sample you're brewing, measure out 250 mL, add 250 mL of water, and mix well. Take your gravity with your lower scale hydrometer, and double the degrees P or the post-decimal figure if you're doing SG. Not the most accurate, but it'll get you in the ballpark, especially if you trust your current hydrometers. Hope this helps.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Strongsville, Ohio
    Posts
    285
    Quote Originally Posted by swright83 View Post
    I've had a hard time finding good hydrometers, especially that aren't super expensive. We don't do much brewing over 20 P or so, but there have been occasions when we needed it. My method is to take the sample you're brewing, measure out 250 mL, add 250 mL of water, and mix well. Take your gravity with your lower scale hydrometer, and double the degrees P or the post-decimal figure if you're doing SG. Not the most accurate, but it'll get you in the ballpark, especially if you trust your current hydrometers. Hope this helps.

    Hey Swright,

    We're done that too, its a good work around.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Posts
    12
    Anton Paar DMA 35

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    510
    As above, a good digital meter will give you automatic temperature-correction and a range of different units (Plato, degrees, etc.). Anton Paar, Mettler and others are available. Calibration is generally on water (eg. DMA35) or air + water (most bench meters, Mettler portables, etc.).

    Two-point calibration - ie. air + water - is to my mind better as it allows both the slope and offset to be adjusted for greater accuracy.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    255
    I use the low-gravity version of these, but I don't remember if I bought it from Cole-Palmer or somewhere else:

    https://www.coleparmer.com/i/h-b-ins...ometer/0829982
    https://www.coleparmer.com/i/h-b-ins...ometer/0829984
    https://www.coleparmer.com/i/h-b-ins...ometer/0829986

    The thermometer is nice for measuring temperature, but you shouldn't use the printed gravity corrections because the influence of temperature varies with gravity (see the ASBC hydrometer correction tables in method Beer-3). If you know your gravity, temperature, and the calibration temperature of your hydrometer - usually 20C/68F for Plato hydrometers - the Corrections_Temp spreadsheet at https://sites.google.com/site/republicbrewpub will adjust your measurement based on the ASBC table.

    Joe

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    419

    Get a densitometer

    Due to manufacturing techniques, inappropriate sample prep, and user error there is really no such thing as an actual 'high precision' hydrometer. If you just need 'good enough' data, use any decent hydrometer. If you need accurate date, gt a DMA 35...or the easy dens from Anton Parr or just about any other good, bench marked instrument. Also follow the ASBC method for measuring density. you won't be disappointed.
    Larry Horwitz

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