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Thread: Bottling at 12.000 ft - Cusco, Peru

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Cusco, Peru
    Posts
    2

    Bottling at 12.000 ft - Cusco, Peru

    Hi everyone!!!
    First I want to apologize for my english, I'm not a native speaker.

    We are a Cusco, Peru based microbrewery at 12,000 ft of altitude, and having problems with a 4 head isobaric bottling equipment.

    We are bottling at 0°C (32°F) at 9PSI directly from the Unitank and everythings goes smooth until deataching the bottle from the filling system, when it foams inmediatly and looses almost all of the beer.

    Some times we don't get that much foam and we get to finish the process but when opening the bottle later it feels under carbonatated.

    So we have a dilema here, if we put more CO2 then we will have more problems bottling, but if not, we will get a flat beer.

    If someone could give me an advice it will kindly appreciatted

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Moab, Utah
    Posts
    527

    Unitank Gas Setting

    Quote Originally Posted by AndesPride View Post
    Hi everyone!!!
    First I want to apologize for my english, I'm not a native speaker.

    We are a Cusco, Peru based microbrewery at 12,000 ft of altitude, and having problems with a 4 head isobaric bottling equipment.

    We are bottling at 0°C (32°F) at 9PSI directly from the Unitank and everythings goes smooth until deataching the bottle from the filling system, when it foams inmediatly and looses almost all of the beer.

    Some times we don't get that much foam and we get to finish the process but when opening the bottle later it feels under carbonatated.

    So we have a dilema here, if we put more CO2 then we will have more problems bottling, but if not, we will get a flat beer.

    If someone could give me an advice it will kindly appreciatted
    Your C02 pressure on your Unitank may need to be in the range of 18-27 PSIG. 9 Sounds way low without knowing more about your setup.
    Warren Turner
    Industrial Engineering Technician
    HVACR-Electrical Systems Specialist
    Moab Brewery
    " No Cell Phone Zone."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Enterprise, Oregon
    Posts
    1,882
    What is your target carbonation level? Measured carbonation level in the bright?

    What kind of bottler? How does the bottler release pressure from the bottles?

    9 psi sounds awful low even if using a beer pump.
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Cusco, Peru
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by TGTimm View Post
    What is your target carbonation level? Measured carbonation level in the bright?

    What kind of bottler? How does the bottler release pressure from the bottles?

    9 psi sounds awful low even if using a beer pump.
    Hi

    Mi target is 2.6 vol of CO2 and the carbonation charts reads 9PSI for 32F so I'm confused when both of you say that is low.

    We don't use BBT we are bottling directly from the Unitank, no pump either only different pressure.

    Yes the bottler has a pressure release valve and we use it.


    Thanks!!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
    Posts
    819
    What is the carbonation level of your beer? Does your filler allow you to snift? To the bowl/filler head? To atmoshpere? A combination of both? You need to extend that step. The bowl pressure on your filler should definitely be higher. It will still be a rapid transition between filling and capping/crowning.

    Good luck.

    Pax.

    Liam
    Liam McKenna
    www.yellowbellybrewery.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Enterprise, Oregon
    Posts
    1,882
    There should be a restrictor of some sort in the pressure-release system. You may need to have a smaller one fabricated and lengthen the time the snifter is open to allow the bottle to more gradually release the head pressure with breaking the beer.

    We run our bottling line on pressure from the bright tank. Our instruction indicate that the feed pressure--the pressure of the beer flowing from the bright as opposed to the head pressure--should be around 2 bar. We use a very handy device from American Brew Equipment called the Watchdog, which monitors the output pressure and adds head pressure as needed.

    Pressures given are gauge pressure, so are comparable even at your altitude.

    You also need to adjust your headspace pressure to account for your altitude. The pressures given on P/T charts are really absolute, not gauge, so you need to compensate accordingly to keep your beer at or above equilibrium pressure.
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

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