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Thread: RO Water Storage

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Salem, MA, USA
    Posts
    16

    RO Water Storage

    Hi There,
    Im looking for a little advice. The water in our town, as you can see from the thread below has a TDS averaging in the 450 range with certain minerals being very high for certain beer styles. What i am debating doing is putting a light commercial 350 GPD Ro system in to allow me to slowly fill my 550 gallon HLT. Im only brewing on a 2.5bbl system, so i dont need to fill the tank quickly. I only turn the HLT on generally the night before a brew day, so im trying to figure out the correct way to hold the water.

    There seem to be several ways to do it, some of which likely arnt good options:
    Redose with Chlorine and treat with K Meta on brewday
    Find or make a UV Light Recirc System and keep the HLT recircing.
    Other options?

    Thanks Much,
    Jeff Marquis
    Granite Coast Brewing Company

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    College Station, TX, USA
    Posts
    39
    Easiest thing to do is filter into your HLT / CLT and ... that's it. Dose minerals in your mash and kettle to adjust the pH and flavor. We brewed 20 bbl batches off of 1,000 gal HLT and CLTs without much fuss.

    What are you concerned about?
    --Dean Brundage
    Owner / Unscrambler of Eggs
    Blake's Steaks Sandwich Shop
    (650) 823-3389

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Cambria
    Posts
    2
    We are a 3 bbl brewery and we produce RO into a 600L tank. We took a booster pump to pump it into and through our Tankless Water Heater. Then is goes into our mash, sparge or wherever we want it to do. We mix in about 65% RO water to city water. Pumping through the tankless is great as we have mash ready water. We have 5* setpoints on our temp so I shoot for 160, if I need 162 and adjust with direct fire. I run the RO unit during our brewday and come in the next morning and it is filled and shut off with a float valve. Works great.



    Quote Originally Posted by JeffGCBC View Post
    Hi There,
    Im looking for a little advice. The water in our town, as you can see from the thread below has a TDS averaging in the 450 range with certain minerals being very high for certain beer styles. What i am debating doing is putting a light commercial 350 GPD Ro system in to allow me to slowly fill my 550 gallon HLT. Im only brewing on a 2.5bbl system, so i dont need to fill the tank quickly. I only turn the HLT on generally the night before a brew day, so im trying to figure out the correct way to hold the water.

    There seem to be several ways to do it, some of which likely arnt good options:
    Redose with Chlorine and treat with K Meta on brewday
    Find or make a UV Light Recirc System and keep the HLT recircing.
    Other options?

    Thanks Much,
    Jeff Marquis
    Granite Coast Brewing Company

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Moab, Utah
    Posts
    543

    About Tankless units

    Quote Originally Posted by 927BeerCompany View Post
    We are a 3 bbl brewery and we produce RO into a 600L tank. We took a booster pump to pump it into and through our Tankless Water Heater. Then is goes into our mash, sparge or wherever we want it to do. We mix in about 65% RO water to city water. Pumping through the tankless is great as we have mash ready water. We have 5* setpoints on our temp so I shoot for 160, if I need 162 and adjust with direct fire. I run the RO unit during our brewday and come in the next morning and it is filled and shut off with a float valve. Works great.
    If you have a standard " off the shelf " consumer model Tankless unit, its not made for R.O. water. Typical HX construction on those pieces of junk is copper and 316 SS is required for that duty. RO, DI, and all waters in that class are extremely corrosive and ion hungry and will strip any available metal in their course rather quickly. Tankless units are a mickey mouse, throw away, Engineering blunder that will always come off as cheap in terms of first cost, but in real terms will cost you far more than what is thought in the long term.
    They can be made to work in certain very narrow envelopes and they are a maintenance and repair nightmare. No sane Mechanic would ever enjoy breaking out tools for one of those units. They are META time wasters.
    Warren Turner
    Industrial Engineering Technician
    HVACR-Electrical Systems Specialist
    Moab Brewery
    " No Cell Phone Zone."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Salem, MA, USA
    Posts
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by brundage View Post
    Easiest thing to do is filter into your HLT / CLT and ... that's it. Dose minerals in your mash and kettle to adjust the pH and flavor. We brewed 20 bbl batches off of 1,000 gal HLT and CLTs without much fuss.

    What are you concerned about?
    So my concern is having to hold the water in a room temp tank for 2-4 days between brewdays. Itss stainless and i can seal it so im not worried about Algae bloom, but bacteria growth is a thing, right?

    We dont use a tankless unit. I have 2 15KW elements shot into an SS Hoover tank(thats also our collection tank) that creates our brewing and cleaning water. Going through a tankless is not part of our setup.

    Jeff

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    College Station, TX, USA
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffGCBC View Post
    So my concern is having to hold the water in a room temp tank for 2-4 days between brewdays. Itss stainless and i can seal it so im not worried about Algae bloom, but bacteria growth is a thing, right?
    Not really something to be concerned about over the course of 2-4 days in RO water. There really isn't a lot for bacteria to eat in filtered water. HTH
    --Dean Brundage
    Owner / Unscrambler of Eggs
    Blake's Steaks Sandwich Shop
    (650) 823-3389

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Carmel, IN
    Posts
    49
    Biologic growth is not a significant concern with RO. There aren't enough "building blocks of life" (nutrients) in that water to foster growth. If the vessel is covered or sealed, then you won't have to worry about atmospherically-derived nutrients getting to the water. And the final thing is that there is nothing to worry about if this water is used in the brewing process. It can be full of critters and the process will take care of them.

    Adding a UV unit to RO output or including a recirculating UV unit in a tank won't really do much good if the walls of the vessel get colonized, so its not a worthwhile investment in protection.
    WaterEng
    Engineering Consultant

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