Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Eurospec glycol chiller

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Boca Raton Fl
    Posts
    9

    Eurospec glycol chiller

    I am looking for a small glycol chiller to run outside in 100 to 110F temperatures.
    Power supply at the site is 215 or 415v, 50hz, 3 phase.

    All the major USA vendors have said they cannot supply this, the 50HZ rather than 60HZ being a problem

    Can any European brewer recommend a reliable vendor or any 'desert ' brewers tell me where they got their chiller please?

    Cheers
    Paul Farnsworth
    University of Arizona

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Caldwell, ID
    Posts
    44
    Paul,

    How small are you looking for?

    I could see how the 115 would cause concern, but the 50Hz shouldn't be that big of a deal.

    We build a lot of stuff that is in Phoenix, Vegas, etc.


    Thanks,

    Jeff

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Johnson_Thermal; 08-31-2019 at 01:39 PM.
    Johnson Thermal Systems
    sales@johnsonthermal.com
    Johnsonthermal.com
    208.453.1000

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Moab, Utah
    Posts
    572

    Go With Johnson

    I would suggest you let Johnson Thermal build you a machine for this specification.
    They can design it for all of your needs more than likely.
    They make a good solid product.
    If you can give details and photos of the proposed site and layout I may have some suggestions on a few fronts that could smooth things out.

    Star
    Last edited by Starcat; 09-01-2019 at 01:20 PM.
    Warren Turner
    Industrial Engineering Technician
    HVACR-Electrical Systems Specialist
    Moab Brewery
    " No Cell Phone Zone."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Stuart, FL
    Posts
    453
    Not sure why a “desert” brewer would be any different than any other brewer in terms of Glycol chillers, but I’ve used an American chiller on 50hz before. It was in South India. Also used two units in Dallas at weeks long triple digits.

    My understanding is that electric motors designed to work on 60hz can be run on the same voltage at 50hz without major issues in most cases. There is a drop in efficiency (20%), and the motor speed and pitch might be slightly different (motors tend to hum or buzz). It should not harm the components in most cases, but this should be verified by an equipment engineer (manufacturer).

    Another (better) option may be a simple frequency converter. I have seen both these and voltage converters used for Industrial equipment in international applications. No need to modify an actual unit, just modify the supply to the unit. Buy the North American Chiller. They are generally much better than alternatives.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Moab, Utah
    Posts
    572

    Differences in locality

    Quote Originally Posted by UnFermentable View Post
    Not sure why a “desert” brewer would be any different than any other brewer in terms of Glycol chillers, but I’ve used an American chiller on 50hz before. It was in South India. Also used two units in Dallas at weeks long triple digits.

    My understanding is that electric motors designed to work on 60hz can be run on the same voltage at 50hz without major issues in most cases. There is a drop in efficiency (20%), and the motor speed and pitch might be slightly different (motors tend to hum or buzz). It should not harm the components in most cases, but this should be verified by an equipment engineer (manufacturer).

    Another (better) option may be a simple frequency converter. I have seen both these and voltage converters used for Industrial equipment in international applications. No need to modify an actual unit, just modify the supply to the unit. Buy the North American Chiller. They are generally much better than alternatives.
    The Difference is the condenser entering air temperature with respect to what was designed, the air density if there is elevation, and the actual BTU/hr. said machine can run under real world conditions. There is a need for modification if you want the system to both perform and last. One of the single largest documented reasons for compressor failures is overheating, which leads to all manner of secondary induced failures. A system can run but is not running well if the condensing temp is way over design. The compression ratio of certain gases can make this an extreme problem. If you ever note a compressor failure under these conditions, the oil will most likely be blackened. Also, POE is a VERY problematic lubricant.
    A correctly implemented Desuperheater can solve a lot. If a system is expected to run in conditions that are above design criteria for condenser entering air temp " all the time " then it needs modification. Dallas is my home town.

    Star
    Warren Turner
    Industrial Engineering Technician
    HVACR-Electrical Systems Specialist
    Moab Brewery
    " No Cell Phone Zone."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Stuart, FL
    Posts
    453
    Frequency converter is the proper answer in this case. (Or 50hz euro spec’d unit sized to BTU requirement) - probably difficult to find in 110/115V.

    There is no doubt there are finite differences in efficiency and reliability based on environmental criteria, however the point was more to the fact that a pre-packaged glycol chiller intended for brewing (from a reputable manufacturer) is likely to have an operating range inclusive of most environments on earth. Like Dallas for instance. Never had to specifically adjust or custom build for these elevated temperatures, other than glycol brix concentrations. Same with high temps and humidity in South India and South Florida. Same with single digits up north. Obviously it’s going to work better and last longer with reduced delta T loads (in either direction) regardless of manufacturer or design.

    I put this analogous to a car. You can set your fuel trim based on air density and altitude to maximize horsepower, or you can buy a decent Camry that gets the job done from sea level to Pikes Peak. Even if the paint starts to chip after 10 years. If your planning to tow a trailer, get an F350. Basically, match the load requirement. Don’t drive at redline constantly. Your engine will blow up. It’s not good for it regardless of manufacturer. Customized stuff costs more, takes longer, and breaks more often. It’s great if you like to learn and have deep pockets though.

    FWIW I drive a Hyundai. It was cheaper, had a better warranty, drove off the lot, and (knock on wood) has 150K with never an issue.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •