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Thread: Putting lines/taps through the wall

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Mammoth Lakes, CA USA
    Posts
    1

    Putting lines/taps through the wall

    Hey All,

    We're trying to figure out the best way to get out tap lines through the wall. Right now we just have a normal looking two by four wall, and was just thinking we could space them so the 2x4's dont get in the way of the lines. But i was thinking that maybe it might be better to put in a little more work and put a 'window' where the taps should go. I made a quick diagram. What are your thoughts?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Lakewood, CO
    Posts
    60
    Personally, I like the freedom to put what I want where I want it, without constraints. So I would frame it with the "window" to avoid studs interfering with tap shanks. This lets you use whatever spacing works for your faucets and, more importantly, your tap handles. I've worked at too many breweries and tap rooms where the tap handles have to be turned just so to avoid them hitting each other while pouring. You just need to make sure the "lintel" that spans the window is substantial enough to not sag and you should be good. Also, if you use a non-standard spacing, you may have to get a custom made backsplash, since most of the premade SS ones with drain pans have a standard spacing (2-3/4"?) that, IMO, is too tight.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Enterprise, Oregon
    Posts
    1,955
    Remember that you need to keep the entire beer lines cold, including the shanks of the faucets. If this is coming directly from a walk-in cooler, you need a "shadow box" with cold air circulating from the cooler. If it's a beer trunk, you might want to build out an insulated box to utilize the glycol cooling to keep the shanks cold.

    Warm shanks mean wasted beer when you're having a slow day, and every time you pour the first of the day. They'll foam until the beer cools them off, and beer is an expensive coolant.

    Unless you like mildew, you'll also have to insulate the cold space from the wall space, else you'll have condensation dripping inside the wall.
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

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