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Thread: Launch of lactic-acid producing yeast – Sourvisiae®

  1. #1
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    Launch of lactic-acid producing yeast – Sourvisiae®

    Last week Lallemand launched Sourviase®, a lactic acid producing bioengineered yeast allowing brewers to ferment and sour in one easy step using a single organism. See below the official launch statement, if you have any questions about this new product feel free to contact me directly at brewing@lallemand.com

    Cheers,
    Eric

    Name:  Mascoma-Sourvisiae-Square-Full.jpg
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    Mascoma and Lallemand Brewing are pleased to announce the launch of the first dry bioengineered yeast for brewing. After years of research and testing, we are thrilled to make this yeast available to craft brewers willing to experiment and provide a combination of both efficiency and flavor to their brews. Lallemand Brewing is at the forefront of innovation with full label transparency on their products; they wish to provide exciting tools to breweries to push boundaries and increase the quality of craft beers around the world in association with their team of experts. Mascoma (a company of Lallemand) is a leader in research and development of new industrial biotechnology products; their expertise in yeast improvement is highly recognized, most predominantly in the bioethanol field.

    Sourvisiae® is a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast that produces alcohol and lactic acid simultaneously in less than 5 days with no off flavors and no biogenic amines production. These features save precious time during the brewing process by avoiding any other souring step (in the kettle or in barrels) and make it extremely safe and easy to clean as bacteria are not introduced in the brewery. The level of acidity produced by Sourvisiae® is easily controlled either by blending the yeast with another strain or alternatively by blending the final beer.

    We have performed extensive trials with Sourvisiae® both internally and externally across the United States of America. The advantages of Sourvisiae® were easily recognizable and accepted by brewers, a fact which makes us confident that we are offering an innovative product for the next generation of sour beverages. Sourvisiae® represents the first product in a line of bioengineered yeasts that will bring exciting new flavors and opportunities to the brewing industry.

    This product is only available in the United States, for more information or to buy it, visit the product page
    https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/en/...ls/sourvisiae/
    Lallemand is a global leader in the development, production and marketing of yeast, bacteria and specialty ingredients.

  2. #2
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    Has anyone had a chance to try this yeast?
    Linus Hall
    Yazoo Brewing
    Nashville, TN
    [url]www.yazoobrew.com[/url]

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by lhall View Post
    Has anyone had a chance to try this yeast?
    Will be brewing with it this week. Will post results...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ASB Anthony View Post
    Will be brewing with it this week. Will post results...
    Hi. Can you tell me how your beer turned out with this new yeast?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lallemand Eric View Post
    Last week Lallemand launched Sourviase®, a lactic acid producing bioengineered yeast allowing brewers to ferment and sour in one easy step using a single organism. See below the official launch statement, if you have any questions about this new product feel free to contact me directly at brewing@lallemand.com

    Cheers,
    Eric

    Name:  Mascoma-Sourvisiae-Square-Full.jpg
Views: 773
Size:  77.7 KB

    Mascoma and Lallemand Brewing are pleased to announce the launch of the first dry bioengineered yeast for brewing. After years of research and testing, we are thrilled to make this yeast available to craft brewers willing to experiment and provide a combination of both efficiency and flavor to their brews. Lallemand Brewing is at the forefront of innovation with full label transparency on their products; they wish to provide exciting tools to breweries to push boundaries and increase the quality of craft beers around the world in association with their team of experts. Mascoma (a company of Lallemand) is a leader in research and development of new industrial biotechnology products; their expertise in yeast improvement is highly recognized, most predominantly in the bioethanol field.

    Sourvisiae® is a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast that produces alcohol and lactic acid simultaneously in less than 5 days with no off flavors and no biogenic amines production. These features save precious time during the brewing process by avoiding any other souring step (in the kettle or in barrels) and make it extremely safe and easy to clean as bacteria are not introduced in the brewery. The level of acidity produced by Sourvisiae® is easily controlled either by blending the yeast with another strain or alternatively by blending the final beer.

    We have performed extensive trials with Sourvisiae® both internally and externally across the United States of America. The advantages of Sourvisiae® were easily recognizable and accepted by brewers, a fact which makes us confident that we are offering an innovative product for the next generation of sour beverages. Sourvisiae® represents the first product in a line of bioengineered yeasts that will bring exciting new flavors and opportunities to the brewing industry.

    This product is only available in the United States, for more information or to buy it, visit the product page
    https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/en/...ls/sourvisiae/
    I listened to the MBAA (I believe) podcast regarding this yeast. Having heard that and read the technical data sheet I still have one question:
    How does this work in a brewery producing clean beers? For example, many brewers take extra precautions using Belgian strains that contain the diastaticus enzyme. Is there a chance of cross contamination that would turn a clean beer sour? Or do normal cleaning processes effectively take care of the yeast?

  6. #6
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    Great question, this is not a diastaticus, killer or otherwise wild yeast strain. In was engineered using a standard brewing strain as a background. Use normal sanitation protocols and CIP and you will be fine. If you are able to keep your hefeweizen strain out of your pale ales then you will be able to avoid cross contamination of Sourvisiae.
    Lallemand is a global leader in the development, production and marketing of yeast, bacteria and specialty ingredients.

  7. #7
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    Any plans for a European release Eric? Sounds fun.

    Sent from my VOG-L09 using Tapatalk

  8. #8
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    How sour?

    What is the ph and Titratable acid % that can be expected?
    The attenuation?
    Alcohol tolerance?
    O2 requirements?
    re-pitchability?
    Flocculation?
    Cost? I assume its more than average.
    Brewmaster, Minocqua Brewing Company
    tbriggs@minocquabrewingcompany.com
    "Your results may vary"

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by joon9 View Post
    Any plans for a European release Eric? Sounds fun.
    We would love to, but Europe is much more restrictive around GMOs so European release won't be in the near future. Reception in the USA has been overwhelmingly positive so far, so this bodes well for expanding into other markets eventually.
    Lallemand is a global leader in the development, production and marketing of yeast, bacteria and specialty ingredients.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Briggs View Post
    What is the ph and Titratable acid % that can be expected?
    The attenuation?
    Alcohol tolerance?
    O2 requirements?
    re-pitchability?
    Flocculation?
    Cost? I assume its more than average.
    pH could go as low as 3.0 with TA of 1.2%
    Alcohol tolerance around 12% abv
    Treat it as a standard dry brewing yeast, you can aerate as normal but aeration is not strictly required.
    Re-pitching not recommended due to the stress of high levels of lactic acid at the end of fermentation.
    Flocculation: medium to high
    Cost is currently $199 through Scott Labs USA https://tinyurl.com/vsl4os6

    If anyone wants the full TDS send me a PM.
    Lallemand is a global leader in the development, production and marketing of yeast, bacteria and specialty ingredients.

  11. #11
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    Yeast blend data and pH?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lallemand Eric View Post
    Last week Lallemand launched Sourviase®, a lactic acid producing bioengineered yeast allowing brewers to ferment and sour in one easy step using a single organism. See below the official launch statement, if you have any questions about this new product feel free to contact me directly at brewing@lallemand.com

    Cheers,
    Eric

    Name:  Mascoma-Sourvisiae-Square-Full.jpg
Views: 773
Size:  77.7 KB

    Mascoma and Lallemand Brewing are pleased to announce the launch of the first dry bioengineered yeast for brewing. After years of research and testing, we are thrilled to make this yeast available to craft brewers willing to experiment and provide a combination of both efficiency and flavor to their brews. Lallemand Brewing is at the forefront of innovation with full label transparency on their products; they wish to provide exciting tools to breweries to push boundaries and increase the quality of craft beers around the world in association with their team of experts. Mascoma (a company of Lallemand) is a leader in research and development of new industrial biotechnology products; their expertise in yeast improvement is highly recognized, most predominantly in the bioethanol field.

    Sourvisiae® is a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast that produces alcohol and lactic acid simultaneously in less than 5 days with no off flavors and no biogenic amines production. These features save precious time during the brewing process by avoiding any other souring step (in the kettle or in barrels) and make it extremely safe and easy to clean as bacteria are not introduced in the brewery. The level of acidity produced by Sourvisiae® is easily controlled either by blending the yeast with another strain or alternatively by blending the final beer.

    We have performed extensive trials with Sourvisiae® both internally and externally across the United States of America. The advantages of Sourvisiae® were easily recognizable and accepted by brewers, a fact which makes us confident that we are offering an innovative product for the next generation of sour beverages. Sourvisiae® represents the first product in a line of bioengineered yeasts that will bring exciting new flavors and opportunities to the brewing industry.

    This product is only available in the United States, for more information or to buy it, visit the product page
    https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/en/...ls/sourvisiae/
    Hey Eric, I got the power point which shows the graph of g/L Lactic Acid and different blends of yeast ratio (ex. 100% Sourvis. was around 9 g/L lactic acid). I was wondering how that translates into pH? I see the blends starting from 80% Sourvis. basically start at 4 g/L lactic acid and go down from there. Is there a pH correlation to understand just how sour that is compared to the Sourvis. control?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by simpleroots View Post
    Hey Eric, I got the power point which shows the graph of g/L Lactic Acid and different blends of yeast ratio (ex. 100% Sourvis. was around 9 g/L lactic acid). I was wondering how that translates into pH? I see the blends starting from 80% Sourvis. basically start at 4 g/L lactic acid and go down from there. Is there a pH correlation to understand just how sour that is compared to the Sourvis. control?
    It really depends on your particular wort, the malts used, water chemistry etc. pH is not the best way to measure the amount of lactic acid since pH is not linear with lactic acid concentration. A bit of lactic acid may drop the pH from 4.0 to 3.5, but much more lactic acid would be required to drop the pH from 3.5 to 3.0. A sour beer will tend to buffer at around pH 3.0, very tough to drop below that although I have seen pure unblended Sourvisiae drop into the high 2.9's.

    As for the powerpoint you are referring to showing blends of Sourvisiae with a traditional brewing yeast (i.e. Nottingham), I do not have the specific pH data for each blend. But in general, it seems like a small amount of Nottingham goes a long way in terms of reducing the amount of lactic acid production (through competition for sugars). As a starting point, I would say that 10% Nottingham blended with 90% Sourvisiae would cut the amount of lactic acid by about half compared to pure Sourvisiae. This is a great strategy to reduce the amount of lactic acid in your Sourvisiae fermentation. Of course, it may require a bit of trial and error to get the ratio that hits the sweet spot you are aiming for.
    Lallemand is a global leader in the development, production and marketing of yeast, bacteria and specialty ingredients.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lallemand Eric View Post
    pH is not the best way to measure the amount of lactic acid since pH is not linear with lactic acid concentration. .
    If your doing sours you should be doing titrations for acid concentration.
    Brewmaster, Minocqua Brewing Company
    tbriggs@minocquabrewingcompany.com
    "Your results may vary"

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Briggs View Post
    If your doing sours you should be doing titrations for acid concentration.
    Yes, there is a standard method for this, see ASBC Method Beer-8 (requires subscription)
    http://methods.asbcnet.org/methods/Beer-8.pdf
    Lallemand is a global leader in the development, production and marketing of yeast, bacteria and specialty ingredients.

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