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Thread: Apple Kolsch

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Bangalore, IN
    Posts
    26

    Apple Kolsch

    My brewer did a good job with his last beer, so I told him he could play a bit on his next one. He currently has it as an apple pie Kolsch. He wants to add some apple, nutmeg and cinnamon...not really my thing but it might work. Only thing that's hard to wrap around is the apple addition. I was thinking of just getting the concentrate to add in near the end of ferm, simply because it's hard enough here to find decent apples, and hard to get them processed hygienically as well. Anyone done an apple addition before?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cocoa, Fl
    Posts
    88
    We have an apple pie brown that we use 42 pounds of puree for eveything two bbls. We add it to the boil to help caramelize the sugars a bit. Not sure how it would work after fermentation. Apples love to ferment.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
    Jon Sheldon
    Owner/Brewer/Chief Floor Mopper
    Bugnutty Brewing Company
    www.bugnutty.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    209
    Adding fruit and spices to a Kolsch-style beer would make it no longer a Kolsch-style beer. It would then be just an Apple Pie Ale.

    I would add apple concentrate and pectic enzyme near the end of fermentation, and spund the beer to trap aroma and carbonate at once. Add spices in bright tank after clarification. Let flavors develop then rack off.
    Todd G Hicks
    BeerDenizen Brewing Services

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Stuart, FL
    Posts
    499
    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Hicks View Post
    Adding fruit and spices to a Kolsch-style beer would make it no longer a Kolsch-style beer. It would then be just an Apple Pie Ale
    Kolsch uses a distinct yeast, making different than an “average ale”. If it was fermented with US-05, wlp001, 1056, or bry-97 then I would agree totally. Also lagering an ale is fairly unique to Kolsch-styles. The yeast and process is enough to qualify as Kolsch-Style, IMHO.

    Your comment would be analogous to saying a Grapefruit IPA is not an IPA because originally IPA did not contain grapefruit.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Reno, Nevada USA
    Posts
    448

    HoneyCrisp Apples/dehydrated

    Just released a beer with dehydrated HoneyCrisp
    Apple's steeped in secondary at 55degrees.
    Cored and sliced then put into convection oven to dry down. Started with 10lbs whole apples. Yielded
    1.55 lbs dried product. Put in nylon mesh bags
    Dropped into FV through 4" top t/c opening.
    Had to get them off the beer after 50hrs apple presence
    Way more noticeable than I anticipated.
    This was 10bbls.
    Would just call it a fall harvest beer. Don't lump it into
    A category.
    All the best
    Lance

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Bangalore, IN
    Posts
    26
    Thanks for the answers so far. I realize we're not making a true Kolsch, just to the base style to start with. If we're getting nit picky though, this isn't Cologne, so it can't be called a Kolsch anyways. We're using the new Lallemand Koln yeast, and I told him he couldn't do crazy unless he had a solid base beer first. I can't spund either. I don't trust my dry hop port gaskets to hold under pressure, so I use blow-off buckets and then force carb in the brite. I know I can't source apples fast enough at this point to put them in the hot side, so it will have to go into either the fermenter or brite. I didn't consider drying them down, I'll have to look into that.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Moab, Utah
    Posts
    600

    Yep

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Hicks View Post
    Adding fruit and spices to a Kolsch-style beer would make it no longer a Kolsch-style beer. It would then be just an Apple Pie Ale.

    I would add apple concentrate and pectic enzyme near the end of fermentation, and spund the beer to trap aroma and carbonate at once. Add spices in bright tank after clarification. Let flavors develop then rack off.
    It would absolutely no longer be Kolsch. Just like all the other attempts at making beer and then tacking something onto the end of the new name and saying its some hybrid of the original and still worthy of having the original name as part of the new name. This is being done with IPA's for example that are not IPA's at all. Not by any fantasy in the known universe.
    Last edited by Starcat; 11-14-2019 at 06:56 AM.
    Warren Turner
    Industrial Engineering Technician
    HVACR-Electrical Systems Specialist
    Moab Brewery
    " No Cell Phone Zone."

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