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Thread: Adding Maltodextrin to cold fermented beer

  1. #1
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    Mar 2019
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    Adding Maltodextrin to cold fermented beer

    Curious if anyone has added maltodextrin to a beer that has been finished and no longer at ferm temps? If so what was your process? Thinking of boiling down some with water, filling a sanitized/pressurized brink and transferring to beer via racking arm and pressure?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    Stuart, FL
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    It’s refreshing to see someone ask a question while at the same time proposing their solution. Finally someone who wants to engage as opposed to being fed an easy answer.

    Yes that would be the method I would suggest, although I would typically prefer to transfer and inject in-line for mixing.

    The question will be stability. Have you been able to remove or deactivate enough yeast cells to avoid re-fermentation? Are you wanting to induce a re-fermentation?

    I would be curious as to why you would like to add back the maltodexterin. There are a variety of maltodexterins, and some are “longer” than others. If the purpose is to add sweetness, this may not be the best option as maltodexterins can range from somewhat sweet to flavorless. If memory serves, Fructose is one of the “sweetest” sugars.

  3. #3
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    Mar 2019
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    Mostly due to over attenuation, leaving the finished beer with a much lighter mouthfeel than desired. I have separated from yeast but transferring is also an option.

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Plainwell, MI, USA
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    You also have the option of adding in some lactose. That will give you a lot of mouthfeel without being very sweet, and it won't have the potential to referment. Another option would be to make a really strong tea of something like CaraPils, which is less unfermentable than plain sugar, and would add mouthfeel with more of a grain flavor. I'm not sure I'd go with that second option... but it got me thinking.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    Stuart, FL
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    The lactose is where I was headed too, but you do have the potential downside of it being dairy. Just make sure you notify your customers it has lactose if you go that route. It is advantageous in this situation because it is non-fermentable and it is roughly 1/6th the sweetness of table sugar (Fructose/Glucose). It will add a certain type of body to the beer, like blonberg mentions.

    Even though you have "removed yeast", if you have not used a filter or centrifugation, you will likely have a number of live cells still in suspension. I think you can have as much as 1 million cells per ml while still looking translucent to the naked eye. You can cell count and stain to verify if needed. You can use sulphites to suppress further yeast activity if needed.

  6. #6
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    Mar 2019
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    US
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    Just to let everyone know how it turned out, I brought lactose and water to a boil,tranferred to sanitized yeast brink,cooled and pushed into brite with co2. Worked perfect for what I was looking to achieve! Thanks for the repsonses

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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cocoa, Fl
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    89
    Thanks for the update. Sometimes we forget to post them.

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    Jon Sheldon
    Owner/Brewer/Chief Floor Mopper
    Bugnutty Brewing Company
    www.bugnutty.com

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