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Thread: 24v converter for ball valve

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Western, NC
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    59

    24v converter for ball valve

    Guys, I have 5 Johnson Controls A421 and 5 110v solenoid valves. One of those valves blew today and I'm thinking of replacing the solenoids with ball valves. I'm not finding too many AC powered ball valves. Most seem to be 24v. I'm wondering what kind of power converter is necessary for these valves. Is it as simple as buying something like this and plugging it into my JC A421? https://www.parts-express.com/Search...itesearch=true

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Palau
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    2,053

    Don't do it!

    If you're going to replace solenoids with something more robust, then I suggest air-operated angle seat valves. Good ones are around $100 or so. They are bulletproof and highly reliable. A few features to look for are: brightly colored indicator showing valve open; LED showing solenoid on; manual bypass button on solenoid. I'll never install anything else again.
    Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Polson, Montana, USA
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    1,287
    Quote Originally Posted by gitchegumee View Post
    If you're going to replace solenoids with something more robust, then I suggest air-operated angle seat valves. Good ones are around $100 or so. They are bulletproof and highly reliable. A few features to look for are: brightly colored indicator showing valve open; LED showing solenoid on; manual bypass button on solenoid. I'll never install anything else again.
    Phillip,
    Do you have source for these?

    Prost!
    Dave
    Glacier Brewing Company
    406-883-2595
    glacierbrewing@bresnan.net

    "who said what now?"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Kentucky
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    560
    I would agree with the points made by Philip. Pneumatic actuated angle seats are the bees knees. I like the 2000 series valves by Burkert myself. However, I have had an actuator spring break on one before (probably a manufacturing defect), so I wouldnÂ’t say quite bullet proof, but probably the most robust you can get for long term industrial applications. And they are great for washdown areas.

    If OP is looking for actuated ball valves that run off 24V or 110V Belimo makes a great option. They indicate valve position, offer full flow, and can be manually operated if needed. One advantage to motorized ball valves is the reduced likelihood of water hammer due to slow closing. Another is that you can set a limit for how far the valve opens if you want a partial restriction.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Western, NC
    Posts
    59
    Thanks guys.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Moab, Utah
    Posts
    612

    Choices

    For sure this choice Phillip has mentioned is an industrial strength solution.
    This does make for a more complex system, component wise.
    I have a 24VAC solenoid soultion that never fails and costs about USD$ 20.00 each.
    I see 120V Coils in a plant washdown setting as a bad idea. There is really no good reason to go above 24V in this application.
    Last edited by Starcat; 01-26-2020 at 09:35 AM.
    Warren Turner
    Industrial Engineering Technician
    HVACR-Electrical Systems Specialist
    Moab Brewery
    " No Cell Phone Zone."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Palau
    Posts
    2,053

    Angle seat valves

    Are a bit more complicated, I'll give you that. Besides the main angle valve body, they have a pneumatic solenoid pilot. But the failure rate of a small, pneumatic solenoid using dry, clean plant air is minuscule compared to larger glycol solenoids. We use a small, inexpensive pneumatic throttle valve on the actuator outlet to slow down the action. That also further complicates the assembly, but again the failure rate of these items is far below that of a similar-sized glycol solenoid. Most folks will want to select a single-action, spring to close valve. Troubleshooting them is made super-simple if you have an indicator cap on the actuator to let you know when it's open; an LED on the solenoid that shows when it's actuated; and a manual bypass button on the solenoid to check air flow. Sorry that I don't have a source for any particular brand in US. Only used these elsewhere. And as Starcat points out: never use 110vac for control!
    Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--

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