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View Full Version : Brewery plant open to Restaurent and odour issues?



Westernloco
09-26-2014, 12:10 PM
Hello all,

I was wondering if anyone has had experience in the brewpub industry where the brewery plant was directly in the restaurant? I'm talking with a business owner and the location he is thinking the brewery plant would be placed in the center of the building with a wrap around mezzanine setup where the customers would be located. What steps can be taken to reduce the odors from a brew length? Have ventilation directly over the Mash Tun and kettle?

Any input is appreciated!

dantose
09-26-2014, 12:24 PM
Hello all,

I was wondering if anyone has had experience in the brewpub industry where the brewery plant was directly in the restaurant? I'm talking with a business owner and the location he is thinking the brewery plant would be placed in the center of the building with a wrap around mezzanine setup where the customers would be located. What steps can be taken to reduce the odors from a brew length? Have ventilation directly over the Mash Tun and kettle?

Any input is appreciated!

I've seen such setups where it is not an issue. A direct vent outside and as you mentioned should be all that's needed.

Bainbridge
09-26-2014, 12:42 PM
It can be...troublesome. I used to work in a brewpub where the 5bbl brewhouse was enclosed in a glass room at the edge of the dining area and the cellar and brites were behind the bar. Lot of running back and forth but it can be done. The key is enclosed brewspace. One time I was cleaning out a fermenter and the hose slipped, shot water right out the open sliding door (small, enclosed room, venting fermenter -> door open). Sprayed a table of diners down. Oops! Just water, but had to comp them anyway.

But check out these photos of Fork and Brewer (http://www.forkandbrewer.co.nz/gallery/interactive-guide) brewpub in Wellington, NZ. Visited there in March, interesting setup. Struck me that it's a good way to create slipping hazards. But one of the beauties of New Zealand is that it's much, much harder to sue people for injuries caused by negligence, etc. due to their universal no-fault injury coverage.

So that's the big concern: how are you going to CYA around hot/boiling liquids, fire/scalding steam, floods of smelly, sticky gunk around, venting various toxic gasses, pressure vessels that have been known to occasionally implode/explode, and also just the risk of embarrassment when your brewer opens the wrong valve one day and gets an IPA shower, or worse, the sight of a very public industrial accident.

And on the other side, if you've ever been in a brewery open to a kitchen, you notice that miasma of fry grease gets everywhere. Gross.

el_mocoso
09-26-2014, 03:01 PM
Not a great picture available that I can find, but 75th St. Brewery in Kansas City has this set up. I've been there a few times and never smelled the brewing. I believe they do most of the brewing in off-hours. You might want to call them and see what they have to say.

Either way, I would invest in a hood and a strong exhaust fan.

BeerBred
09-26-2014, 08:31 PM
In a brewpub the "brewery" is generally visible to the guests, that's the point. I had a 15bbl brewery in the center of 10,000 feet of restaurant. It was on the first floor of a 5 or 6 story historical building with 12' ceilings. The office tenants throughout the building always complained. The brewery was enclosed in one glass room with the bar on one side and the fermenters in a separate glass room. Vent the stack out the side or top of the building. You won't eliminate the smell completely. Brewing produces heat and steam. It won't all go out the vent. If there are no tenants in the building I don't see it as much of a problem. People coming to a brewpub, I would think they expect and even welcome the aroma.