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Thread: organic sanitizers/ peracetic acid?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    5

    organic sanitizers/ peracetic acid?

    So I'm starting a brewery on my farm. The farm is already certified organic so we are going to produce certified organic beer as well. Ingredients are no problem but I'm trying to figure out what to use for sanitizing the brew house. Normally I would go with star san or iodophor but these are not allowed under NOP rules. As of now, my leads include peracetic acid and maybe chlorine dioxide. Still have to follow up to see if the chlorine dioxide is permitted. Both these seem kind of volatile compared to starsan which is kind of ironic seeing as we are looking to be certified organic. Any folks have any experience with these and can you share some insights. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Frederick, MD
    Posts
    6
    I use peroxyacetic acid to sanitize almost everything in the brewhouse that touches beer or wort: Fermenters, brites, heatx, wort line, etc. I only use Iodophor & Starsan for small parts like clamps & gaskets. It comes in 5 gallon containers and that quantity goes a long way. I use 120mL/BBL. Not sure if that rate a appropriate for all PAA, but your chemical supplier can give you that info.

    -Scott
    .

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Shoreacres, BC
    Posts
    3

    Peracetic acid is the way to go

    I was the Head Brewer at a regional sized all-organic brewery in Canada. Peracetic acid is allowed under organic rules as is caustic (NaOH) and citric acid. Strong acid cleaners are not allowed (phosphoric, nitric, sulphuric, etc.). We always did a caustic clean followed by several hot then cold rinses followed by peracetic acid (100-200 ppm). Canadian and US organic rules are almost identical, but all approved cleaners should be on the Permitted Substances List. Ozone is also allowed for organic processing. The beauty of peracetic acid is that it dissociates into hydrogen peroxide and water, so it is suitable for no rinse applications. I would stay away from chlorine containing substances around stainless steel, as it can lead to corrosion.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    5
    Thanks, much appreciated.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Livermore, CA
    Posts
    596
    PAA is going to be your friend. It works amazingly well, and is not difficult to handle. You should wear gloves and a face shield, but that is standard for any chemicals. It will not leave tastes in the finished product, it breaks down into things that are normally in beer.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Enterprise, Oregon
    Posts
    1,794
    PAA is also great for athlete's foot at 200 ppm!
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

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