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Thread: Storage properties

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Mineral Point, Wisconsin, USA
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    2

    Storage properties

    Back when I started in the business of brewing (1998) hop descriptions always had information on storage properties. NOW I never see that. For example, "A Pocket Guide to Traditional Hop Varieties", from FMB says about Cascade. "After six months of storage at 20C the Cascade loses about 50% of the alpha acids. Alpha acid content at harvest is between 4.5 - 7%." Or "Pride of Ringwood. "The aroma is not outstanding and diminishes quickly because of poor storage stability. The alpha acid range is 9 - 11% which falls off to 50% after six months storage at 20C"

    This is USEFUL info, instead of the marketing fluff about "thyme and fresh kumquats notes" that I usually see, specially with so many old hops floating around for sale.

    Anyone know who gives current data on storage qualities?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Palatine, IL
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    90
    Typically the Hop Storage Index (HSI) will be listed along with the alpha acid % on the package of hops. That is the same info as specified in the Cascade description.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Mineral Point, Wisconsin, USA
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    2

    info sort of

    I have 5 boxes of hops from YCH (purchased surplus from another brewer) and none of them have the AA% on the box. It does have a "best used by (date) statement, "when stored in unopened container under appropriate storage conditions. see www.ychhops.come" blah blah blah. If you go to that web site you can look up an analysis of of the lot you have. All this would be useful after the purchase fact but NOT for general variety characteristics. There is a line item "HSI" which according to the web site, measures deterioration due to ultraviolet light. Isn't storage temperature important as well? I didn't want to go back to the brewery to look up a lot number to check and see if it does actually describe the % of alpha acids lost over time, at a certain temperature as you seem to indicate it does. How do I know what the deterioration will be from a "best if used by" date? I have not found a description of what is meant by "appropriate storage conditions" either. So i'm still in the dark about the condition of the hops, until after I've bought them. Maybe. What am I missing?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Palatine, IL
    Posts
    90
    Quote Originally Posted by Shandygaff View Post
    I have 5 boxes of hops from YCH (purchased surplus from another brewer) and none of them have the AA% on the box. It does have a "best used by (date) statement, "when stored in unopened container under appropriate storage conditions. see www.ychhops.come" blah blah blah. If you go to that web site you can look up an analysis of of the lot you have. All this would be useful after the purchase fact but NOT for general variety characteristics. There is a line item "HSI" which according to the web site, measures deterioration due to ultraviolet light. Isn't storage temperature important as well? I didn't want to go back to the brewery to look up a lot number to check and see if it does actually describe the % of alpha acids lost over time, at a certain temperature as you seem to indicate it does. How do I know what the deterioration will be from a "best if used by" date? I have not found a description of what is meant by "appropriate storage conditions" either. So i'm still in the dark about the condition of the hops, until after I've bought them. Maybe. What am I missing?
    The most prevalent HSI definition is 'the percent lost after 6 months stored at 20C'; exactly what the cascade description mentioned. Sounds like HSI wasn't a common metric back then.

    I also don't like when the AA% is not listed. However it's never been more than a phone call away.

    Same as beer, Heat, light and oxygen are detrimental to hops. Keep them as cold as possible and you'll be good. Freezer if possible, cooler is still fine however.

    If you really want to know more, some expensive lab equipment (spectrophotometer) is the next step.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    monmouth, IL USA
    Posts
    36

    what good is the HSI?

    What good is the hop storage index if its at 20degf? Who stores their Hops at 20degf? I want a HSI at 0degf

    Does anyone know how convert ?

    s

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Chesterfield, UK
    Posts
    1,610
    it's 20 deg Celcius, not Fahrenheit - so 68 F, nominal room temperature

    And why would you want it at zero F ??

    My understanding is that the hop producers / etc. store them chilled, not frozen as much as long term perishable food products such as meat or fish, as low temperatures may split the lupulin glands and thus allow even faster degradation in the presence of oxygen.

    To quote
    It is recommended that processed and baled hops be stored in separate rooms. The optimum storage temperature is 24 to 28°F (-4.44 to -2.22°C) at a relative humidity of 70 to 85%, with little air movement to prevent excessive drying. Sufficient space should be allowed around the bales for ventilation, so that any heat generated in the bale may be dissipated. This is particularly important immediately after baling.
    Source - WFLO is indebted to David W. Hysert of John I. Haas, Inc., Yakima, Washington, and Dr. Stephen Neel, World Food Logistics Organization, for the review and revision of this topic.
    dick

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    monmouth, IL USA
    Posts
    36
    we store at freezer temp at or below 0degf. It is my understanding that 28degf is optimal for baled hops but once it is pelletized and under N2 broken lupulin glands are no longer a problem but oxygenation is and the colder the better? I suspect intact lupulin glands oxidize slower when in the presents of O2. Am I wrong in this thinking?


    thanks steve

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Chesterfield, UK
    Posts
    1,610
    Pelletised hops are normally packaged in an inert atmosphere, so oxygenation is only going to happen due to the minute amount of oxygen left entrained within the hop pellets before flushing and sealing up.

    Once the seal is broken of course, and air allowed access, then of course this is a different matter altogether.

    According to YCH

    T-90 hop pellets should be stored near-freezing, preferably between 30°F and 41°F (-1°C and 5°C). They will remain stable in closed containers under the following conditions: 3 years in nitrogen flushed, vacuum sealed packaging. Storage stability does vary per variety and can be negatively affected by exposure to oxygen, heat and/or light.

    Store in dry, odor free environment at temperature range of 30°F to 41°F (-1°C to 5°C). Prolonged exposure to high temperatures may cause foils
    to burst and reduced quality.


    So unless you are going to buy several years worth, you are simply wasting refrigeration energy (read money) keeping them at this temperature

    For what it is worth, if you take deliveries of small (but economic) quantities at a time, and you find when you open the carton that the bag has split, you are far more likely to get a refund a couple of weeks after delivery than you are a couple of months or longer after delivery.
    dick

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