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Thread: deaerated water in twist rinse?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    Oklahoma City, OK
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    deaerated water in twist rinse?

    is anyone doing this in smaller scale operations (5-10k bbl/year)? The deaeration systems I'm looking at seem like overkill financially, but the residual filtered rinse water (and all it's dissolved O2) from our twist rinse that is still in the can prior to fill is bugging me.

  2. #2
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    The rinse is to remove dust and any other debris, not to remove oxygen. So you are wasting money using deaerated water for rinsing. Solids free, sterile water (or at least potable quality), preferably with low levels of calcium salts to minimise scale build up in the rinse system is all that is required
    dick

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by dick murton View Post
    The rinse is to remove dust and any other debris, not to remove oxygen. So you are wasting money using deaerated water for rinsing. Solids free, sterile water (or at least potable quality), preferably with low levels of calcium salts to minimise scale build up in the rinse system is all that is required
    Understood, however there is a small amount of residual rinse water that clings to the interior of the can as it enters the filler, thus mixing with the beer as the can is filled. I imagine this small amount of residual water is increasing the overall DO of the liquid in the can. Maybe it would be better to set up a filtered air jet at the twist rinse output to help blow 100% of the rinse water out of the can before it's right side up again?

  4. #4
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    You will use a heck of a lot of air - and energy to do this. All the, admittedly large, breweries I have worked at with twist rinsers don't have air jets. The small ones I have seen using such as Cask Brewing Systems also do not have air jets, but achieve decent results - or so they claim!!
    dick

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Why? The can is full of air when it hits the filler. A double-evac and CO2 flush before the filler would make more sense, if the can can take the vacuum.
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    Denver, CO, USA
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    In the tests we've done, we haven't found measurable added DO levels (measurable within the noise of successive sampling) due to use of normal rinse water. It doesn't appear to be a factor.

    As for vacuum evac, that is of course not possible in a can like it is in a bottle and is the reason that inline can fillers have lower (or the same) DO pickup levels as counter-pressure fillers, because you can't do evacuation, only flushing.

    Josh Van Riper
    Twin Monkeys

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